1,400-year-old Hall of the First Kings of East Anglia discovered in Britain (photo)

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1400-year-old hall of the first kings of East Anglia discovered in Britain (photo)

Along with a large wooden hall, experts have identified a moat that surrounded the royal complex, traces of cooking and eating beef and pork, as well as various artifacts.

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During their recent archaeological excavations in the small British town of Rendlesham (Suffolk County ) experts have discovered the remains of the hall of the first kings of East Anglia, writes Express.

The wooden building, built about 1400 years ago, was 22 m long and 9 m wide, located on the territory of the royal complex with an area of ​​about 6 hectares.

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1400-year-old hall of the first kings of East Anglia discovered in Britain (photo)

1400 found in Britain -summer hall of the first kings of East Anglia (photo)

For 150 years, a large province of the kingdom of East Anglia, located around the Deben River valley, ruled from this place. Remarkably, Rendlesham was the site where King Æthelwold was baptized as King Swithhelm of the East Saxons between 655 and 663.

As lead author of the study, Professor Christopher Scull of Cardiff University noted that Rendlesham is the most extensive and materially rich settlement of that time. And these excavations only confirm that there was a royal residence.

“Only in Rendlesham do we have the most detailed information about the settlement and landscape of the early English royal center, along with a range of metalwork that illuminates the life and work of its inhabitants. Together they radically rewrite our understanding of the sophistication, complexity and international relations of the society of that time,” — experts explained.

1400-year-old Hall of the First Kings of East Anglia discovered in Britain (photo)

1400-year-old hall of the first kings of East Anglia discovered in Britain (photo)

Along with a large wooden hall, experts have identified a moat that surrounded the royal complex, traces of cooking and eating beef and pork, as well as various artefacts. acts. This included clothing ornaments, personal items, as well as glassware for drinking and earthenware.

Moreover, archaeologists have found traces of earlier human activity, both the early Roman period and the early Neolithic.