80% of Ukrainian refugees in the Netherlands found work: most in Amsterdam and The Hague

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80% of Ukrainian refugees in the Netherlands found work: most — in Amsterdam and The Hague

Due to their special status, Ukrainian citizens find work much faster than other asylum seekers. For Ukrainians, all bureaucratic procedures are simplified – no need to wait for permission to start working.

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According to the Netherlands Welfare Agency (UWV), more than 80% of Ukrainian refugees in the country have a job. Citizens of Ukraine are predominantly employed in the hotel industry and find work through employment agencies. Most work in major cities such as Amsterdam and The Hague. NL Times reports.

According to statistics, about 55,000 Ukrainians live in the Netherlands. The UWV agency received 46,000 applications from employers who hired refugees. This is about 83% of registered refugees from Ukraine.

Ukrainian citizens find work much faster than other asylum seekers. Experts explain this by the special status of refugees from Ukraine. Unlike natives of Afghanistan or Syria, citizens of Ukraine do not have to go through the asylum procedure and wait for permission to start working.

According to the representative of the Office of Social and Cultural Planning (SCP) Jaco Dagewos, the issue of removing bureaucratic obstacles that prevent people from starting work is a problem of Dutch policy.

“Now, practice has shown that this is really effective,” — he explained.

According to him, the government will develop rules that would allow all asylum seekers to start working immediately after the acceptance of the application.

26-year-old Anastasia, who worked as an accountant in Odessa , moved to the Netherlands on July 1 after her company was forced to stop work due to the outbreak of war.

“I wanted to go to war, I had shooting training, but my eyesight is not very good,” — she explained.

She used to make good money, but after the outbreak of the war she had to move to the Netherlands to be able to support her parents who stayed at home.

The host family provides free accommodation and food , and Anastasia , who works as a waitress in Amsterdam, can send money to her parents. According to her, many came here for money to help those who remained.