Albatross males formed a family due to failure with females: scientists named the reason (video)

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Albatross males formed a family because of failure with females: scientists named the reason (video)

Representatives of the same sex give each other signs of attention so as not to be completely alone.

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In New Zealand, two male albatrosses came together after being rejected by a female. The story about this was shown on the air of the BBC's Frozen Planet II program.

On the uninhabited subarctic island of Antipodes, researchers led by host David Attenborough spotted a 14-year-old albatross boy who decided to find a mate. He tried to win over the female by showing off his wingspan – this is a typical mating ritual for this species of birds. At the most crucial moment, an opponent attacked the suitor, who managed to drive the applicant away.

Having failed, the albatross decided to try his luck again with another lonely relative. This time the ritual was successful, and a few minutes later the birds started a stormy romance, hugging, kissing and showing signs of attention to each other. But the authors of the film noticed that both partners are males. It is possible that the couple will spend the rest of their lives together, because albatrosses are one of the most monogamous bird species. As a rule, they travel separately, but every two years they look for their favorite partner to mate and raise chicks.

According to the BBC team, same-sex relationships are increasingly common in the Antipodes Islands due to the large number of males, there are approximately three times more than females. The latter fly off to hunt to the north, where they often die, colliding with the equipment of fishing fleets. According to researchers, homosexual partnership does not bring any advantages to males, such as procreation, but albatrosses still prefer them to complete loneliness.

Recently, a pair of same-sex penguins had their first chick at the New York Zoo. Among these animals, homosexual relationships are quite common, and they behave like full-fledged parents. A heterosexual pair of Humboldt penguins constantly broke their eggs, so the zoo staff transferred one of them to a family of two males who coped with the task.