An amazing sight. The Hubble telescope saw the very first stage of the birth of a new star (photo)

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An amazing sight. The Hubble telescope has seen the very first stage of the birth of a new star (photo)

The new image shows a dense cloud of gas and dust, which will soon turn into a young star.

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The Hubble Space Telescope took a picture of a dense cloud of gas and dust called CB 130-3. This cosmic object is called the dense core, and it is located in the constellation Serpens at a distance of 650 light years from us. Against the backdrop of this dense cloud, you can also see thousands of other already brightly shining stars, writes Universe Today.

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The process of the birth of new stars is fraught with many more mysteries that astronomers have yet to solve. A new image from the Hubble telescope shows a dense accumulation of gas and dust, which already contains the “embryo” of a future star. This dense core is located in a region of space where new stars are constantly being born from large gaseous nebulae.

The birth of a star is a long process, and such dense cores are only part of it. It all starts long before these objects appear in clumps of gas and dust called nebulae. These nebulae can be affected by shockwaves from supernova explosions that tear them apart, resulting in clumps of stuff called dense cores.

An amazing sight. The Hubble telescope saw the very first stage of the birth of a new star (photo)

An amazing sight. The Hubble telescope saw the very first stage of the birth of a new star (photo)

Inside these objects, all the substance twists and falls into the center, that is, the substance is concentrated in one place. When this happens, pressure and temperature increase and when enough matter has accumulated, a protostar appears. Depending on the mass of accumulated material, the process of forming a protostar can take up to 1000 years. After its appearance, the protostar, which is not yet a full-fledged star, continues to attract matter from the dense core to itself for several hundred thousand more years.

The future star can stay in the protostar state for several hundred million years, but in the end the temperature and the pressure becomes so high that a thermonuclear reaction begins in the core of the protostar. This is the moment of the birth of a new full-fledged star.

CB130-3 is one of many dense cores that astronomers watch to understand all the details of star formation. Scientists already know that inside this cloud is a stellar germ that should eventually become a star similar to the Sun.

An amazing sight. The Hubble telescope saw the very first stage of the birth of a new star (photo)< /p>

An amazing sight. The Hubble telescope saw the very first stage of the birth of a new star (photo)

Objects like this have interesting chemical properties. The molecules it contains are especially useful for tracking the chemical composition of the thick clouds of gas and dust in which stars form. They use these molecules to track the chemical elements in protoplanetary disks, especially complex organic compounds that could ultimately influence the possible formation of life.

By the way, as scientists have found, the density of CB130-3 is not the same everywhere. It is much smaller on the outskirts and increases strongly closer to the center. This high density makes it hard to see what's going on inside, but the Hubble data give an idea of ​​the internal structure of this object, where the future star is born.

As Focus already wrote, huge a spiral galaxy will help astronomers solve one of the biggest mysteries in astronomy.