At the coronation, Camilla will not be able to wear a crown with the legendary Kohinoor diamond

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 At the coronation, Camilla will not be able to wear the crown with the legendary Kohinoor diamond

The 105-carat diamond was presented to Queen Victoria but is now claimed by India and other countries

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Queen consort Camilla was to be crowned with the famous 105-carat Kohinoor diamond, but it appears that either a different crown will be used or the huge diamond will be removed from the crown. Because ownership of Kohinoor is a contentious issue. The Daily Mail writes about this.

The Kohinoor diamond is one of the largest in history and is in the crown of the Queen Mother along with 2800 small diamonds.

The priceless 105-carat gem was presented to Queen Victoria by Duleep Singh, the last ruler of the Sikh state, in 1852, recut and in 1853 was inlaid into the British royal crown. In 1902, Kohinoor was transferred to the crown of Queen Alexandra, made for her coronation, and in 1911 to the crown of Queen Mary. In 1937, it was moved to the crown of Queen Elizabeth Bowes Lyon, where it remains today.

An Indian ruling party spokesman said that the use of “Mountain of Light”, as Kohinoor is translated, could bring back “painful memories” of colonialism .

 At the coronation, Camilla will not be able to wear the crown with the legendary Kohinoor diamond

At the coronation, Camille will not be able to wear the crown with the legendary Koh-i-nur diamond

Despite the fact that Dalep Singh gave the diamond to Queen Victoria officially, but then he was a teenager, so this gift is disputed in at least three countries, including India, some even demand the return of the diamond.

“Coronation Camille and the use of the Kohinoor diamond evoke painful memories of the colonial past,” said Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi's ruling party spokesman.

At the coronation, Camilla will not be able to wear the crown with the legendary Koh-i-nur diamond

At the coronation, Camilla will not be able to wear the crown with the legendary Kohinoor diamond

The British Parliament initially wanted to use the Queen Mother's crown, but are now considering removing the Kohinoor from the setting, or replacing the crown with, for example, Queen Victoria's crown.

Kohinoor, which means “Mountain of Light” in Persian, is one of the largest diamonds in the world.

It weighs 21 g (105 carats). And although it is one gram smaller than the largest Cullinan I diamond in the world, set in another treasure of the crown – the scepter, it is much more famous.

It is believed that the history of Kohinoor began in 1300. The earliest mention of him refers to the powerful Mughal ruler in 1628.

The Kohinoor originally weighed 38.2g (186 carats) before it was cut.

At the coronation, Camilla will not be able to wear the crown with the legendary Koh-i-Nur diamond

 At the coronation, Camilla will not be able to wear the crown with the legendary Kohinoor diamond

It was mentioned in the 1740s when it was noted as one of the many stones on the Mughal Peacock Throne, which was stolen by the Iranian Afsharid leader Nadir Shah of Delhi.

He returned to India in 1813 and became a powerful symbol of power until he arrived in Britain in 1849 thanks to John Lawrence, Chief Punjab Commissioner.

The diamond was presented to Queen Victoria a few years later by Dalep Singh, the last Sikh ruler, who was then a teenager. But in India, they believe that Dalep was forced because his mother was a hostage.

Now several countries claim Kohinoor at once.

India

India – because the stone is believed to have come from the Kollur Mine on the south bank of the Krishna River in central-east India. India has long advocated the return of the diamond since its independence from British colonialism in 1947.

In 1976, Britain refused a request to cede the diamond, citing the terms of the Anglo-Sikh peace treaty.

And this became a bone of contention between the British and Indian governments. During a visit to India in 2010, then British Prime Minister David Cameron told local media that the diamond would remain in the UK.

Narendra Modi's government attempted to end the dispute in 2016 during a Supreme Court case that whether India should demand his return.

“It was neither stolen nor forcibly taken away,” Indian Solicitor General Ranjit Kumar told the court at the time. The Supreme Court of India in 2017 rejected a petition asking him to be returned to India. Calls to return the diamond to India resurfaced last month after the Queen's death.

Pakistan

Pakistan – because it is claimed that the diamond was mined in what became Pakistan after the separation of India and Pakistan after gaining independence in 1947.

The diamond originally belonged to the Kakatiya dynasty, which adorned a statue of a Hindu goddess with it. In 1849, after the conquest of Punjab by British troops, the property of the Sikh Empire was confiscated.

Kohinoor was transferred to the treasury of the British East India Company in Lahore. The property of the Sikh Empire was taken as compensation for the war.

In 2016, lawyer Javed Iqbal Jaffrey filed a Pakistan lawsuit in the Lahore High Court in Pakistan. The court accepted a petition asking the government to return Koh-i-Noor from the UK.

In 2019, Pakistani Information Minister Fawad Chaudhry called for the diamond to be returned and placed in the Lahore Museum.

Afghanistan

Afghanistan also has claims to Kohinoor. The Taliban believe that the diamond is the “rightful property” of this country.”

“The history of the diamond shows that it was taken from us to India, and from there to the UK. We have much more rights to the diamond than the Indians,” said Taliban foreign affairs spokesman Faiz Ahmad Faiz.

According to him, Kohinoor was taken by Nadir Shah from Delhi in the 1700s after the capture of the Mughal Empire. And when the Shah was killed in 1747, the diamond was taken by the Afghan general Ahmad Shah Abdali and taken to Kabul. Shah Shuja owned the stone, and when he was overthrown, he presented the diamond in 1813 to the man who released him from prison, Duleep Singh's father, Maharaja Ranjit Singh, who took him to India.

Iran

Iran

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Like Afghanistan, Iran claims Kohinoor because of Nadir Shah. Shah, a native of modern Iran, was the founder of the Afsharid dynasty, which in its heyday occupied most of the Persian Peninsula, modern Iran, Iraq and Afghanistan, parts of Central Asia and up to Georgia. It was Nadir Shah who seized all the treasures of the Peacock Throne of the Great Mughals and deceived the diamond from Shah Mohammed by exchanging turbans with him. According to legend, he exclaimed: “A mountain of light!”, which sounds like “Koh-i-Nur” in Persian.