Bible story. Where could Goliath actually be buried?

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Bible story. Where in fact, they could have buried Goliath

Scientists suggest that the giant's head was buried near Jesus.

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The Bible is a large collection of interesting stories. One of them is the famous battle between David and Goliath, the Philistine warrior. This confrontation ended with David burying the severed head of the giant.

However, an interesting theory has recently emerged. Biblical scholars have suggested that one of the hills near Jerusalem is the site of the same famous battle, writes The Jerusalem Post.

The excavations have not yet been carried out. This area is located within the Church of the Holy Sepulcher. However, scientists believe that this is where archaeologists will be able to find the skull of Goliath. Now they are searching to prove that he was buried there – in the place where Jesus also rests.

Experts note that if archaeological work is allowed to be carried out and the skull is not even found, this will still remain the site of a famous historical battle .

Rick Schenk of Bethlehem College comments:

“David took the severed skull to Jerusalem. Strange, because Jerusalem was not David's capital, but the city of the enemies of God. What did he do with a gigantic head, the head of a Bronze Serpent? He may have planted it on a hill outside the city for all to see.”

“Whether or not Goliath of Gath is the correct etymology for Golgotha, it was in this city that the the head of Goliath. It was on this hill that Jesus' feet were pierced with nails,” Rick Schenk summed up his reflections.