Bigfoot 5300 years old. How the mountain mummy surprises archaeologists to this day

Spread the love

Share

  • «Bigfoot» 5300 years old. How the mountain mummy surprises archaeologists to this day

    send to Telegram

  • «Bigfoot» aged 5300 years. How the mountain mummy surprises archaeologists to this day

    share on Facebook

  • 5300 year old Bigfoot. How mountain mummy surprises archaeologists to this day

    tweet

  • «Bigfoot» 5300 years old. How the mountain mummy surprises archaeologists to this day

    send to Viber

  • send to Whatsapp

  • 5300-year-old Bigfoot. How mountain mummy surprises archaeologists to this day

    send to Messenger

Researchers believe that the body went through an unusual procedure of burial in a glacier.

Related video

In 1991, a completely frozen mummy was found in a European alpine ravine. She was named Etzi. Archaeologists believe that its age is about 5200 years. Since its discovery, it has been surprising scientists, writes Live Science.

The mummy belongs to the Neolithic era. It survived due to rather strange events. They will probably never happen again. The body of the deceased with an arrow in his back could have been specially dried at low temperatures and placed in a glacier.

However, there are other versions. It is followed by archaeologist Lars Pilo from the Department of Cultural Heritage in Norway, along with colleagues. They have been researching Europe's oldest mummy for thirty years.

In the course of the work, they discovered that Ötzi had a tattoo, what clothes he wore and even what he ate for the last time. At the same time, scientists note that if the victim had been constantly frozen after death, it would have survived much better.

But this is not at all the case. In Ötzi, only the lower half was in almost virgin condition. On the neck, the skin peeled off and exposed the cranial bone. In addition, the fur cape generally fell into pieces.

According to the first version, it was thought that the conflict before Ötzi's death caused these damages. However, a team of researchers led by Lars Pilo concluded that these injuries occurred later. They could have happened after the mummy's body fell into the glacier.

Probably, the ice constantly melted and froze. Artifacts near Ötzi's body, like arrows, also point to this process. Therefore, the upper body of the mummy was exposed several times until 1991.

In recent decades, ice finds like Ötza have expanded significantly. Therefore, scientists come to the conclusion that mummifications in glaciers were more common.

Gradually, scientists find not only human remains, but animals and other valuable artifacts in glaciers.