Britain's highest court rejects Scotland's independence referendum, Edinburgh reacts

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British High Court denied Scotland's independence referendum, in Edinburgh reacted

London does not recognize the Scottish Parliament's right to call for a second secession plebiscite on its own initiative.

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The UK Supreme Court has ruled that the Scottish legislature does not have the power to hold a second independence referendum. It is reported by Sky News.

As specified, the judges made a unanimous decision on this matter. The court ruling says that another vote in the country requires the approval of the UK Parliament.

The President of the Court, Lord Reid, in particular, stressed that the act establishing the Scottish legislature provides that its powers are limited. This means that the Parliament in Edinburgh cannot take legislative initiatives in matters that are the exclusive competence of the Parliament of the United Kingdom in Westminster.

The Scottish government planned to hold a second referendum on declaring independence from Great Britain on October 19, 2023.

It was planned to put the question “Should Scotland become an independent country?” At the plebiscite.

Edinburgh has already reacted to the court's decision. Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said that despite her disappointment, she respects the decision of the UK Supreme Court.

“While I am disappointed with the decision of the Supreme Court, I respect it. The Court does not create legislation, but only interprets it,” – she commented.

According to the Scottish politician, the UK legislation, which does not allow Scotland to choose its own future without the consent of Westminster, “debunks the myth that the UK is a voluntary partnership”, and only adds to the reasons for a referendum.

Referendum on Independence in Scotland

The first referendum on Scottish independence was held on 18 September 2014. Voting turnout was 85% of the population. The votes were distributed almost equally. Thus, 55.30% (2,001,926 people) were against the withdrawal of Scotland from the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. The independence of the country was supported by 44.70% (1,617,989 people).

In April 2019, Nicola Sturgeon said that if the UK leaves the European Union, Scotland will hold a second referendum on the country's independence. In September of the same year, she confirmed the intention of the government in Edinburgh to hold a plebiscite on leaving the United Kingdom.