Canada and Japan want to strengthen their economic and security ties

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Canada and Japan want to strengthen their economic and security ties

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his Japanese counterpart Fumio Kishida during their press conference in Ottawa on Thursday

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his Japanese counterpart Fumio Kishida affirmed Thursday in Ottawa their desire to strengthen their economic ties, but also their security partnership in the Asia-Pacific region.

We have talked a lot about how Canada can be a reliable supplier, not only of energy, but also of essential minerals, resources, including agricultural, said Justin Trudeau during a conference of joint press in the Canadian capital.

Their meeting was also an opportunity to discuss the major reform of Japan's defense strategy, which has greatly increased its military spending. An announcement very favorably received by Canada, said Justin Trudeau, referring to the situation in Asia.

In this region, he pointed to the rise of increasingly authoritarian powers protesters, be it Russia or increasingly disruptive China.

Fumio Kishida is the first Asian prime minister to visit Canada since Ottawa announced a new Asia-Pacific policy in November to counter Chinese influence.

At a time when the international order is exposed to various challenges […] we will strengthen our cooperation with Canada in order to maintain and strengthen peace and stability, Mr. Kishida explained.

We agreed that we would firmly oppose unilateral attempts to change the status quo by force in the East China Sea and the South China Sea, he added.

In the energy field, Fumio Kishida believes that liquefied natural gas will play a crucial role in Japan's energy transition.

Canada is on the way to becoming a major supplier of energy. energy for Japan and South Korea, notably through the liquefied natural gas (LNG) export terminal due to open in 2025 in the west of the country, in British Columbia.

< p class="e-p">On tour to meet his counterparts from other G7 countries, of which Japan has just taken over the rotating presidency for one year, the Japanese Prime Minister visited his allies in Europe this week before to reach North America.

After passing through the Canadian capital, Fumio Kishida travels to Wednesday in Washington.

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