Canada and the United Kingdom cooperate on the Russian and Chinese threat in the Arctic

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Canada and the United Kingdom cooperate on the Russian and Chinese threat in the Arctic

Canadian Armed Forces Chief of Staff General Wayne Eyre said in March that he would not It is not inconceivable that Canada's sovereignty could be challenged in the North (Archives).

The United Kingdom will soon send a military expert on the threat posed to its High Commission in Ottawa by Russia and China in the Arctic.

Nick Diggle is a former Royal Navy officer and Arctic security research specialist. In a sign of deepening cooperation between Canada and the UK on defense matters, Mr. Diggle will arrive in Canada in September.

Protecting the Arctic region is a major concern for the Canadian Armed Forces. At a conference in Ottawa in March, Chief of Defense Staff General Wayne Eyre said Russia had reoccupied bases in its Far North that had been abandoned during the Cold War. .

The threat of a Russian incursion into the Canadian Arctic is very low at this time, General Eyre said, but in his view, it is not It is not inconceivable that Canada's sovereignty could be challenged in the North, especially since in Canada, this region is vulnerable due to its small population and lack of infrastructure.< /p>

Nick Diggle has researched at the University of Oxford on how the UK and Canada can work together to combat the geostrategic threat from Russia and China in the Arctic.

In an October interview with the Sunday Times, a British newspaper, British Foreign Secretary Liz Truss said that London plans to strike new security deals with democratic countries to combat the influence of China and Russia.

General Sir Jim Hockenhull, Britain's head of defense intelligence, meanwhile signaled last year that his country planned to send more intelligence personnel to overseas.

The UK Ministry of Defense told The Canadian Press that it was increasing its defense intelligence personnel stationed at the x27;abroad to help the country build relationships with key international partners.

Nick Diggle, who did not respond to an interview request, joined the Royal Navy as an officer in 1988. He served in the Navy for over 12 years, before joining the UK Foreign Office, where he held various overseas posts and postings including Oman and Mexico.

He has also recently worked on global counter-terrorism issues in London.

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