Canadians picky and greedy in their Halloween candy choices

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Canadians are selective and greedy in their Halloween candy choices

The cost of Halloween candy will increase 13.1% over last year, according to Dalhousie University's Agri-Food Analytical Sciences Laboratory.

Halloween is upon us and a large selection of candies is available to parents when it comes time to buy treats to distribute to little monsters. A survey shows that 62% of Canadians choose to give away treats they would eat themselves. Inflation does not spare the cost of these little treats this year, the price of sweets is also a determining factor in the purchase.

A survey conducted by Dalhousie University's Agri-Food Analytical Sciences Laboratory examines, among other things, the factors that influence the choice of candy purchased and what parents do with leftover candies the day after Halloween. .

The cost of Halloween candy will rise 13.1% over last year, according to Dalhousie University's Agri-Food Analytical Sciences Laboratory.

A total of 5,530 Canadians were surveyed between October 12 and October 17, 2022.

About 53% of Canadians say they participate in the Halloween by giving candy to children who ring the doorbell, the cost of which has increased by 13.1% over the past year according to this survey.

Never mind, it looks like Canadians will spend an average of $22.40 on candy, which equates to $486 million on candy for the entire country in October.

Asked about the criteria that influence the choice of sweets they will put in their shopping cart, 62% of respondents only select sweets that they would eat themselves.

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Having leftover candy after Halloween is probably something Canadians have in mind when selecting and buying, says Sylvain Charlebois, Director from Dalhousie University's Agri-Food Analytical Sciences Laboratory.

If there is a surplus of treats, it is not considered a burden or a problem, he adds.

The price of treats is also an important factor , as indicated by 52.9% of respondents.

This percentage is much higher in Newfoundland and Labrador (75.2%), compared to 59% of Nova Scotians who consider price the determining factor when buying candy. Prince Edward Island comes third with 58.2%, followed by New Brunswick with 57.8% and Quebec with 52.5%.

Note that the choice of an allergen-free candy is important for 29.7% of Canadians, according to this survey, and that 12.6% think that healthy candy should be bought for children.

The majority of Canadians (58.4%) will put two candies in every child's bag this year, while 18.1% of people surveyed will give more than three.

While some streets are crowded with costumed children parading on Halloween night, others are less so. Thus, 57.9% of people expect about the same number of visitors as last year.

Nearly 58% of Canadians expect about the same number of visitors to their door as last year.

Expectations are high, despite Halloween falling on a Monday this year, says Janet Music, a research associate at the Agri-Food Analytical Sciences Laboratory.

She points out that most of Canadians are expecting a fairly normal Halloween party as it is the first Halloween in three years with limited public health restrictions.

The Halloween party is over, it often happens that there are candies left over that have not been distributed.

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If you plan to feast on surpluses, you are among the majority of Canadians (67%) who plan to do the same as you. Nearly 21% will give them to their own children and 4.4% will throw them away.

When children come home with bags overflowing with treats, 84.1% of parents check the candies collected and remove those deemed potentially harmful.

What parents fear the most when reviewing their children's candies are open wrappers (74.7%), razor blades (71, 1%), needles (70.6%) and drugs (65.5%).

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