Cat alphabet. Scientists have told how we communicate with our pets

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Cat alphabet. Scientists told us how to communicate with our pets

Research shows that talking to cats in their language isn't that hard, just follow a few simple rules.

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While cats have a reputation for being reserved and sometimes asocial, especially when compared to dogs, this is not entirely true. Scientists have come to the conclusion that communicating with pets in their language is not at all difficult – just don’t smile like a human, baring your teeth, it’s better to smile like a cat – squinting your eyes, writes Science Alert.

In a new study scientists from the University of Sussex in the UK have focused on helping people decipher the feline alphabet and finally find a common language with their pets.

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According to Karen McComb, author of the study, there is a kind of cat smile – pet owners most likely noticed that a relaxed and contented cat was sitting with “partially closed eyes” and blinking slowly. Scientists have come to the conclusion that this is the smile of cats and, apparently, people can communicate with pets by copying these expressions.

During the study, two experiments were conducted. During the first, the owners blinked slowly at two dozen cats from 14 different households. Once the cats were comfortable in one of their favorite corners, the owners were asked to position themselves at a distance of about a meter from the pet and blink slowly when the cat looked at them.

During the experiment, the cameras recorded the face of the owner and the faces of the cats, and then compared the recordings with the video of how cats blink without human intervention. The results of the study showed that cats were more likely to blink slowly at their humans when they blinked slowly at them, compared to no interaction.

Slightly over 20 cats from eight different households also took part in the second experiment . This time, it was not the owners of the animals who blinked, but researchers who had not previously met animals. The cameras also captured the faces of the researchers and the muzzles of the people, but also documented their faces when they only looked at each other without blinking.

As in the previous experiment, the scientists looked at the cats and blinked slowly, but apart from they also pulled their hand towards the cat. Studies show that cats were not only more likely to blink in response, but also moved closer to the outstretched hand after the scientists blinked.

According to McComb, their study is the first to shed light on the “universal language” of communicating with cats using slow blinking.