During excavations in Italy, archaeologists discovered an ancient Roman water system (photo)

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During excavations in Italy, archaeologists discovered an ancient Roman water system (photo)

An ancient find was found in a villa where the most famous people of the Roman Empire once lived.

Related video < p> Stabia is an ancient Italian city on the coast of the Gulf of Naples. It is located near Pompeii. During excavations, parts of the ancient Roman water system were found there, writes Heritage Daily.

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The work was carried out in a small ancient garden with a colonnade – peristyles. It was at Villa Arianna. A lead tank with decorations was found there. It was he who was once part of the water distribution system within the villa complex.

In the system, you can see 2 pipes connected to the impluvium – the central reservoir for collecting water in the atrium. The researchers also concluded that the system was previously visible. In ancient times, this location gave the townspeople access to flow regulation as well as water distribution.

Archaeological excavations at the villa were first carried out by the Swiss engineer Carl Weber between 1757 and 1762. He managed to discover an area of ‚Äč‚Äčabout 2,500 square meters with a complex of four parts. It covered the atrium and surrounding rooms, service rooms and a bath, side rooms of the Nero era and a sports hall (palestra) of the Flavian era.

During the eruption of Vesuvius, most of Stabia was destroyed. In 79 AD, the volcano ejected a deadly cloud of superheated tephra and gases to a height of 33 km, molten rock, pumice and hot ash at a speed of 1.5 million tons per second.

As a result, deadly waves enveloped Pompeii and Herculaneum . A significant part of Stabia was buried under tephra. The Roman author Pliny the Elder pointed out that the city had several kilometers of luxurious coastal villas. They were owned by famous emperors Julius Caesar, Augustus and Tiberius.