Eat and die. Why dirty windows are dangerous for a person

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Eat and die. Why dirty windows are dangerous for humans

A new study says that after cooking in the kitchen, harmful substances appear that are not so easy to overcome.

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A lot of our lives are spent in the kitchen. We have breakfast there, sometimes lunch and almost always dinner. In addition, we always clean there. But as a rule, windows are not washed there often.

According to a recent study, windows can contain potentially harmful substances behind a protective film of fatty acids. They are formed after cooking, writes Sci Tech Daily.

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Besides, these substances stay there for a long time.

Scientists from the University of Birmigenham have shown in their study published in the journal Environmental Science that fatty acids found in emissions from cooking are extremely stable. That is why they are hard to split in the atmosphere.

Having hit a hard surface, they simply create a thin film. It accumulates quite slowly. It can only be broken down by other chemicals in our atmosphere. In this process, the film becomes coarser and absorbs more moisture.

But the most dangerous thing is that during this, other harmful pollutants can get into this elastic crust. Therefore, they cannot decay properly in the atmosphere.

Dr. Christian Pfrang, senior author of the study, noted:

“The fatty acids themselves in these films are not particularly harmful, but since they are not break down, they effectively protect any other contaminants that may be under them.

During the study, the team worked with laboratory samples – the so-called proxies. They helped reproduce ultra-thin films of pollution. Neutrons and X-rays were used to study their composition, while changing the humidity and the amount of ozone.

It was found that the so-called lamellar phase – a self-organized arrangement in repeating molecular sheets – makes it difficult for smaller molecules like ozone to reach. After that, the surfaces of the films become less smooth and absorb water more.

Thus, the kitchen develops toxic pollutants on the windows.