Electoral compass: 80% of respondents against lowering immigration thresholds | Elections Quebec 2022

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Election compass: 80% of respondents against lower immigration thresholds | Elections Quebec 2022

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PQ leader Paul St-Pierre Plamondon wants to lower immigration thresholds in Quebec.

This question may have divided the leaders of the five main parties since the start of the election campaign. increase or at least maintain current immigration thresholds.

The thresholds that the next Quebec government should set, especially in relation to its capacity for integration and francization, continue to fuel the debate between the leaders of the Coalition avenir Québec (CAQ), the Liberal Party (PLQ ), the Parti Québécois (PQ), Québec solidaire (QS) and the Conservative Party (PCQ).

From August 28 to September 13, this question was asked directly to 69,998 People by Electoral Compass: How Many Immigrants Should Quebec Admit? The finding is quite clear: 80% of them are against lowering the immigration thresholds.

In fact, 28% of respondents want the current thresholds to be maintained, while more than half would like to see the province welcome a little more (33%) or a lot more (19%) immigrants.

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Unsurprisingly, it is the people inclined to vote for QS or for the PLQ who generally believe that we need to welcome more newcomers to Quebec.

In the case of respondents with solidarity allegiances, two-thirds think that we should welcome a little more (39%) or a lot more (28%) immigrants. The trend is even more marked among Liberal supporters: more than two-thirds think that we should welcome a little more (37%) or a lot more (34%) immigrants.

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The immigration thresholds proposed by the different parties

Moreover, it seems that the respondents of the Electoral Compass mostly recognize the existence of systemic racism in Quebec: 58% of them said they somewhat agreed or strongly agreed with the fact that this is a problem in the province.

The data presented is based on responses to Vote Compass, a project by Vox Pop Labs in partnership with Radio-Canada. Vox Pop Labs is a non-partisan team of political scientists and statisticians.

The Vote Compass is not a survey. Users are not preselected. The data, collected from August 28 to September 13 from 74,807 respondents, was weighted to approximate that of a representative sample of the actual population, based on census data and other demographic estimates.

In the first leaders' debate, the Face-to-Facepresented on the airwaves of TVA, the leader of the Conservative Party, Éric Duhaime, launched an appeal to all the leaders: I think that we all agree here to seek all the powers in Ottawa in terms of immigration.

Let's unite the day after the election, he proposed. Let's speak with one voice the five.

However, if we rely on the results of the Electoral Compass, a majority of respondents (51%) believe that Quebec has enough power with regard to the immigration process. Of this majority, 29% say they are in favor of the status quo, while 21% even believe that Ottawa should have more powers.

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44% of respondents therefore believe that Quebec should seek more powers in matters of immigration from the federal government.

It is difficult to debate immigration thresholds in Quebec without addressing the issue of the protection of French. Since the beginning of the campaign, francization has been the main reason given, along with the reception capacity, by the political parties that oppose the increase in these thresholds.< /p>

However, not all measures to protect French are unanimous. As in the National Assembly, certain provisions of Law 96 on the protection of French, adopted last May, seem to divide the population, according to data collected by the Electoral Compass.

This is particularly the case of the maximum period of six months imposed on newcomers to receive services from the State in a language other than French. Asked about this, 37% of respondents said they disagreed with this measure, while 46% were in favor.

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Among respondents inclined to vote for the CAQ – the party behind Bill 96 – nearly two-thirds (64%) say they are in favor of this measure. As for supporters of the PQ – the party that voted in favor of the bill – the trend is even more marked with 69% of respondents who say they somewhat or strongly agree with this new provision.

Regarding the limitation of the number of places in English-speaking CEGEPs, another provision included in Bill 96, respondents to the Electoral Compass are again divided. Nearly half (47%) say they disagree with this measure, while nearly a third (32%) are in favor of it.

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Those inclined to vote for the PLQ, a party that traditionally defends the English-speaking minority, disapprove of this measure with an overwhelming majority (83%). Conversely, those inclined to vote for the CAQ are mostly in favour, at 72%.

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