Eternal building. Scientists reveal why beavers actually build their dams

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Eternal construction. Scientists reveal why beavers actually build their dams

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why beavers actually build their dams Beavers are known to be tireless builders. They constantly build dense, using both whole trees and their branches for this. In order to erect these wooden structures, rodents use their very strong and sharp teeth. To keep dams strong, rodents use grass, rocks, and mud. But why do they do it? Why do beavers need dams and do they use these structures as a dwelling? Scientists answer these questions in an article for Live Science.

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Beavers, although they are large rodents weighing between 18 and 36 kg, are very clumsy animals that have very short legs, scientists say. Therefore, beavers can be easy prey for predators.

Why do beavers build their dams?

According to Chris Jordan of the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, beavers build dams in order to stay safe and not worry about them becoming prey.

Eternal construction. Scientists reveal why beavers actually build their dams

Eternal construction. Scientists told why beavers actually build their dams

< p>“When these large rodents are on land, they are very vulnerable to predators given their clumsiness. They are slow moving and therefore can be someone’s easy lunch. But when the beavers are in the water, they are almost impossible to defeat. These rodents are excellent swimmers, can hold their breath for a long time under water. It is known that without air they can stay in the water for 10 to 15 minutes. Beavers are dammed to create a small pond and in this pond they are safe, “says Emily Fairfax from the University State of California, USA.

According to Jordan, for example, in the US, beavers create very deep water bodies with dams, where they hide from predators such as cougars, bears, wolves and coyotes. territories and thus the beavers can safely swim to their food: tree bark, leaves and branches. But these rodents also feed on some aquatic plants.

“In addition, beavers create a network of water channels behind their dams, through which they not only get to food, but also can move food through these channels to their secret storage. And of course, in this way they move trees to build and strengthen dams,” Jordan says.

Eternal construction. Scientists have explained why beavers actually build their dams

Eternal construction. Scientists told why beavers actually build their dams

Do beavers live in their dams?

According to scientists, the answer to this question is no: no, they do not live. As a home, beavers use houses that are shaped like an oven. Rodents build these dwellings out of sticks, grass, moss, and mud, either on the territory of the reservoir created by the dam, or on its shore. In these houses, beavers live in families that average 5 individuals.

As for the beavers that live in Europe and Asia, and which are slightly larger than their American relatives, these rodents do the same thing, and build dams are also for protection.

By building dams, beavers help not only themselves, but also many other species, according to scientists. Dams create thriving wetland ecosystems for living creatures.

“Another positive aspect of beaver damming is worth mentioning. When these structures slow down the movement of water, some of it is stored in the soil and plant roots can access it beaver dams also resist wildfires well, making the area a haven for many animals,” says Fairfax.

As Focus wrote, beavers gnaw tundra from all sides, reshaping the Arctic and the consequences of this are already visible even from space. Scientists believe that the activity of these rodents completely changes the landscapes of Alaska.