Feel stress and anxiety: in Britain, they want to extend the law on the protection of animals to fish

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Feeling stress and alarm: in Britain, they want to extend the law on the protection of animals to fish

The Aquaculture Stewardship Council believes that farmed fish should be killed more humanely.

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The International Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC) is pushing the UK to extend animal protection law to fish. This is reported by the British edition of The Guardian.

According to journalists, the organization overseeing the global certification scheme for farmed seafood insists that the fish feel “stress, anxiety and pain.” In this regard, it must be killed in more humane ways.

According to ASC standards, fish must be stunned before being killed.

“Like other animals, fish are intelligent creatures that need protection from unnecessary suffering,” says Nick Palmer, head of the British branch of the animal protection organization Compassion in World Farming.

In Scotland, where salmon farming is prevalent, the industry claims to have moved to “the highest standards of animal health and welfare.” It is emphasized here that all fish are stunned before they are killed.

The authors of the article specify that by 2030, farmed seafood will exceed the global consumption of wild fish.

At the same time, the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) is also trying to introduce appropriate standards for wild-caught fish.< /p>

Wild-caught fish usually die on the deck of fishing boats. According to journalists, caught fish are rarely stunned and may be gutted before death.

Such consultations on new standards for aquaculture come after years of scientific debate about how fish can feel.

” There is now a wealth of scientific evidence showing that fish can experience pain, and many government agencies already recognize this,” says Lynn Sneddon, lecturer in the Department of Biology and Environmental Sciences at the University of Gothenburg, who has studied fish pain for more than two decades.

She believes that fish should receive the same protection as mammals.