Fire was not “invented” by Homo sapiens: the first to kindle a fire on the planet was “star man”

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    Professor Lee Berger, a world-renowned paleoanthropologist, believes that he and his team have made another important discovery.

    , which they found with the team, writes News24.

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    Homo naledi or “Starman” is an extinct species of archaic man, which was discovered in 2013 in the cave of the Rising Dawn, which is considered the “cradle of mankind”. It is dated to the Middle Pleistocene between 335 thousand and 236 thousand years BC. e.

    Initially, more than 1,550 specimens were discovered, which comprise 737 different elements and at least 15 different individuals. In August, Berger and a group of scientists explored the “cramped” cave of Dinaledi.

    According to him, when he raised his head, he realized that the ceiling of the cave was blackened from fire. The most interesting thing is that after leaving the cave, the explorer met with other scientists who also discovered a tiny fire and charred antelope bones in the Drakensburg cave.

    After the first expedition, Berger and his team went to another remote Lesedi cave with extremely difficult in some of them it was necessary to crawl about 250 m. It was discovered only 35 years ago, which is why it is almost untouched.

    There, the researchers found fragments of burnt stones, ashes and animal bones.

    < p>“There are no signs of Homo sapiens…outside the twilight zone of this system. We are in the deepest part, where people don't go. The entire floor that we explored is covered with burnt animal bones, ash…Suddenly our eyes opened. The fire didn't it's hard to find. It's everywhere in the system,” Berger said.

    The researcher said that in the early years of the expedition they found two pieces of ash in the Lesedi cave, and other archaeologists convinced them that there was insufficient evidence for the use of fire by Homo naledi.

    However, now, according to him, they can confidently formulate a hypothesis that, within this system, Homo naledi used and widely spread fire for various reasons. And this discovery paves the way for further research in what is the most extraordinary period of discovery ever.

    Berger is confident that technology is opening up spaces and places in ways no one could have imagined. And now is the time when you don’t need to interfere and say “do not explore”, but rather encourage the desire to go out and gain knowledge in every possible way.