Found a giant hall during the reign of the Viking Harald I Blue-toothed

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Giant hall from the reign of the Viking Harald I Sinezubogo found

Archaeologists have unearthed and explored the giant hall of the reign of Harald I Sinezubogo, King of Denmark and Norway since 958 to 986 AD.

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The discovery was made during construction work in the municipality of Jammerbugt, located in North Jutland, Denmark, writes HeritageDaily.

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The hall itself is up to 40 meters long and 8-10 meters wide. It probably served as an important gathering place for holding political meetings, receiving guests and, in general, as the center of the social life of the settlement.

The design is reminiscent of the structures found in the ring castles of Harald I Bluetooth, in particular Firkat (Hobro) and Aggersborg (Aggersund).

The runestone near the excavation site may date from this period. The stone stands in the Hoon Kirk, on which the following words are carved: “Hove, Thorkild, Thorbjørn set their father Runulv den Rådnilde's stone” (“Hove, Thorkild and Thorbjorn set the stone of their father Runulv den Rodnilde”). It has been dated to 970-1020.

Giant Harald I era found Bluetooth

Giant Viking Harald I blue-toothed hall found

Thomas Rune Knudsen of the North Jutland Museum said: “This is the greatest Viking Age find of its kind in the last ten years, and we haven't seen anything quite like it here in North Jutland”.

Researchers have only been able to excavate part of the hall, but they believe that additional rooms and elements must still be found below the surface to the east of the hall, since buildings of this type rarely stand alone.The excavations themselves will resume after the New Year, as well as the results of the analysis of organic remains using radiocarbon dating, which should be published before the end of 2023.