Frankenstein of the underwater world. Sea slug with a bag instead of a mouth, running away scatters limbs

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Frankenstein of the underwater world. A sea slug with a pouch instead of a mouth scatters its limbs as it runs

Researchers have shown how this miniature creature, only 13 centimeters in size, lives and eats.

Related video < p>What you will not meet on the seabed – thousands and hundreds of thousands of different creatures of bizarre shapes and colors. This time, the attention of scientists was attracted by Melibe viridis, a species of sea slug, a bizarrely shaped nudibranch mollusk that constantly loses its limbs in the depths of the ocean, writes IFL Science.

These sea slugs are known to reach approximately 13 centimeters long, and their body is covered with sticky lobes that act like legs. Green melibas also attract the attention of researchers with their unusual way of feeding.

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It is known that Melibe viridis have lost the radula feeding method that other sea slugs have in the process of evolution – these bizarre creatures use a mouth veil for feeding. They throw it like a net on the seabed, and when the tiny hairs that make it up bump into potential prey, the veil seems to shrink and catch the prey. The poor fellows that get caught in the “net” of the green meliba are then broken into pieces and digested, and then the slug returns to feeding.

However, these are not all the curious features that Melibe viridis possess. It is known that they are able to use their “legs” not only for movement – they cling to the substrate and algae. The most curious thing begins when any predator tries to attack the sea slug – then he uses his limbs to attach one of the legs to his body, and then separates the appendage from himself and runs away.

Researchers note that the main The problem with the survival of these sea slugs is that they need a long enough time to grow a new limb. Therefore, scientists strongly recommend that divers pass by and not try to interact with these sea slugs, so that they do not scatter their limbs on the ocean floor in vain.

Note that, as a rule, green melibas are found in the tropical Indo-Western parts of the Pacific Ocean, as well as in some parts of the Mediterranean.