From Nefertiti to Alexander the Great: the tombs of famous rulers that are still not found

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From Nefertiti to Alexander the Great: tombs of famous rulers that have not yet been found

Although archaeologists have made many important discoveries over the past 100 years, the tombs of some famous people in history have not yet been discovered.

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Thousands of years have already passed since the death of many rulers of ancient states and peoples known to us today. But some of them left a significant mark on history. The only thing that remains unknown is the place of their burial. And scientists do not give up hope of finding them all the same. The Daily Mail has compiled the top 5 tombs of ancient rulers, the location of which is still shrouded in mystery.

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The tomb of Nefertiti, Queen of Ancient Egypt

From Nefertiti to Alexander the Great: tombs of famous rulers still missing

From Nefertiti to Alexander the Great: tombs of famous rulers that have not yet been found

Queen Nefertiti belonged to the 18th dynasty of the rulers of Ancient Egypt. This was the period when this country became a truly world power. She was the wife of Pharaoh Akhenaten, who was known for his religious reforms, which were abolished by his son, Pharaoh Tutankhamun.

Nefertiti ruled Ancient Egypt from 1370 to 1330 BC, first with her husband, and then for several years after his death on her own. Some scholars considered her the mother of Tutankhamun, but later it turned out that she was his stepmother, and the pharaoh himself, who died at 19, was the result of Akhenaten's relationship with his sister. At least that's what some scientists point out. Focus has already written in detail about the features of Pharaoh Tutankhamun, as well as how he actually was during his lifetime.

As for Queen Nefertiti, her death and burial place are still remain a mystery to scientists. Egyptologists believe that she died a few years after Akhenaten and the cause of her death could be a plague that struck Ancient Egypt.

As already written by Focus, archaeologist Nicholas Reeves believes that the tomb of Nefertiti is located next to the tomb of Tutankhamun and provides quite convincing evidence of this.

Although other scientists have scanned the area for hidden rooms and found nothing there, Reeves does not deviate from his idea and hopes to still find the tomb of Nefertiti where he assumes.

The tomb of the wife of Pharaoh Tutankhamen Ankhesenamun

From Nefertiti to Alexander the Great: tombs of famous rulers still missing

From Nefertiti to Alexander the Great: tombs of famous rulers that have not yet been found

Ankhesenamun is the name of the third of the six daughters of Pharaoh Akhenaten and Queen Nefertiti known to scientists. This girl was the wife of Pharaoh Tutankhamen, although in fact they were half-brother and sister, that is, they had one father and different mothers.

When Tutankhamen died at the age of 19, he left his wife, who turned 21, alone and without children. But Ankhesenamun soon married the next pharaoh of Ancient Egypt named Aye, who ruled the country from 1327 to 1323 BC. But what happened to the young woman after Aye's death is unknown.

12 years ago, in one of the tombs in the Valley of the Kings in Egypt, archaeologists discovered a female mummy. DNA analysis showed that this woman was the mother of two twins whose mummies were found in the tomb of Tutankhamun. It is believed that his children died at a very early age.

But subsequent analysis showed that it was impossible to determine exactly who the found woman was. Therefore, how Ankhesenamun died and where Ankhesenamun is buried still remains a mystery.

Tomb of Alexander the Great

From Nefertiti to Alexander the Great: tombs of famous rulers that have not yet been found

From Nefertiti to Alexander the Great: Tombs of Famous Rulers Still Undiscovered

Alexander the Great was king of Macedon between 336 and 323 BC. This state was located in the north of Ancient Greece. Historians rightly consider Alexander the Great one of the most successful generals in history.

He won all the battles during his campaign in Asia and created a huge empire that stretched from Greece to India. But at the age of 32, he died in Babylon in 323 BC

Alexander was buried first in Memphis, Egypt, and then in the late 4th or early 3rd century BC. his remains were reburied in the city of Alexandria, in northern Egypt. But scientists still don’t know where exactly the tomb of Alexander the Great is located.

Recently, Egyptian scientists have proposed a version that the commander’s grave is located in the Siwa oasis, 50 km from the border with Libya, but there was no evidence of this found.

The reason for the death of Alexander the Great is also a mystery, although scientists call both a fever and an infectious disease, and some believe that he could have been killed or he died of a neurological disorder.

The tomb of the Hun leader Attila

From Nefertiti to Alexander the Great: tombs of famous rulers that have not yet been found

From Nefertiti to Alexander the Great: tombs of famous rulers that have not yet been found

No less outstanding commander in history is the leader of the nomadic people of the Huns – Attila. He ruled over the vast territories that he managed to conquer from Germany to the Caspian Sea from 434 AD until his death in 453.

The ancient Romans called Attila the “Scourge of God” because of his destructive campaigns of conquest deep into the Roman empire. It is believed that Attila died at the age of 58, from the fact that on their wedding night under mysterious circumstances, and some scientists believe that his new wife could have killed him.

What happened to Attila's body and where he was buried is still not known. As already written by Focus, ancient stories wrote that Attila was buried somewhere, and the body was immediately placed in a triple coffin, which was made of gold, silver and steel. Recently there has been an assumption that the tomb of Attila is located on the territory of modern Hungary and scientists want to find this place.

The tomb of Genghis Khan

From Nefertiti to Alexander the Great: tombs of famous rulers still missing

From Nefertiti to Alexander the Great: tombs of famous rulers that have not yet been found

It is now known that the famous founder of the vast Mongol Empire, Genghis Khan, lived from 1162 to 1227. His state extended over the vast territory of Asia.

Some stories believe that in all the conquered territories he had numerous wives who bore him hundreds of children. Therefore, there is an opinion, which is supported by some scientists, that now there are approximately 16 million descendants of Genghis Khan on the planet.

By 1227, the Mongol Empire occupied a vast part of Central Asia and China. According to historians, almost 40 million people died as a result of his campaigns of conquest.

After his death at the age of 72 from a sudden illness, the Mongol ruler was buried in a secret place that has never been discovered.

According to legend, Genghis Khan was buried somewhere in the steppe in northeastern Mongolia, but anyone who saw the funeral procession was immediately executed. Therefore, the secret of his grave was never revealed.

Returning to the topic of Ancient Egypt, we remind you that scientists have discovered unusual tattoos on female mummies. As Focus already wrote, the researchers believe that these drawings on the body were protective.