Geoengineering in action. They hope to cool the earth by covering it with an aerosol dome: what scientists think

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Geoengineering in action. They hope to cool the Earth by covering it with an aerosol dome: what scientists think

The idea is not new, but now the White House is interested in it. Scientists told what could be the consequences for the inhabitants of the Earth.

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In recent decades, the problem of cooling the Earth and solving the climate crisis has been in the first place – scientists and climatologists now and then draw up programs to reduce greenhouse emissions and look for other ways to reduce the global temperature of the planet. Today, geoengineers have returned to the dystopian idea of ​​covering the planet with an aerosol dome to combat climate change, and the White House seems to be interested in the idea. However, scientists are not so optimistic, writes Futurism.

The idea of ​​using aerosols to solve the Earth's climate problem is not at all new – the first detailed plan for spraying reflective particles into the ocean was presented to US President Lyndon Johnson back in 1965. Then the estimated cost of the project was about 500 million dollars. However, fifty years ago, such ideas looked very utopian, the use of such methods was more suitable for the film “The Matrix” than for real life. Today, however, researchers have revisited the idea of ​​reducing the amount of sunlight hitting Earth in order to reverse the climate crisis. And it seems that this time the White House is again interested in the project.

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It is known that the US government will officially coordinate the “solar geoengineering” project for the next five years. That's how long it will take to evaluate the prospects for the Sunshine Reflection Program. However, it can already be said that the cost of a new plan to combat climate change has increased significantly and has already reached about $ 10 billion.

Scientists note that sulfur dioxide is the main candidate for the introduction of stratospheric aerosol – this substance has a rather unpleasant smell, and is emitted during volcanic eruptions or chimneys of coal plants. However, scientists are still looking for alternative substances – since the use of sulfur dioxide promises clear environmental pollution.

Another option for cooling the Earth could be the process of brightening sea clouds – scientists propose introducing sea salt into them, as a result of which the reflectivity of clouds will increase significantly.

However, not all scientists support such methods of combating climate change. According to Janos Pasztor, executive director of the Carnegie Climate Governance Initiative, the main problem is that the aerosol dome cannot be seen as the main way to solve climate problems. Reduction of emissions should continue to be a priority in the fight against the climate crisis, he said, and the spraying of nanoparticles could be one way to reduce the consequences.

Another problem that worries scientists is the consequences of spraying substances, type of sulfur dioxide – until now, researchers cannot predict all the risks. However, they confidently note that acid rain and a surge in respiratory diseases in the event of such a scenario would be hard to miss.