Hidden threat. Traces of smoking can remain on surfaces for years and cause skin diseases.

Spread the love

Share

  • A hidden threat. Traces of smoking can remain on surfaces for years and cause skin diseases< /p> send to Telegram

  • A hidden threat. Traces of smoking can remain on surfaces for years and cause skin diseases

    share on Facebook

  • A hidden threat. Traces of smoking can remain on surfaces for years and cause skin diseases

    tweet

  • A hidden threat. Traces of smoking can remain on surfaces for years and cause skin diseases

    send to Viber

  • A hidden threat. Traces of smoking can remain on surfaces for years and cause skin diseases

    send to Whatsapp

  • A hidden threat. Traces of smoking can remain on surfaces for years and cause skin diseases

    send to Messenger

A hidden threat. Traces of smoking for years can remain on surfaces and cause skin disease

Studies show that damage to the skin may well lead to future health problems.

Related video

The risks of smoking and passive smoking have been known for a long time and a lot. However, it is still not clear what the danger is of burnt tobacco particles that settle on the surface – the so-called third smoking, or third-hand smoking, writes Science Alert.

In the new study, scientists focused on studying how third-hand smoke affects humans. First, it became known that these particles are able to remain on clothing and surfaces for months, or even years. Secondly, they activate markers associated with the early activation of contact dermatitis, psoriasis, and a number of other skin diseases.

U Focus. Technology has its own Telegram channel. Subscribe so you don't miss the latest and exciting news from the world of science!

The new study involved 10 people aged 22 to 45 years. They were each asked to wear clothing exposed to tobacco smoke for three hours. The subjects also had to spend 15 minutes on the treadmill every hour.

The researchers then examined the blood and urine samples of the subjects. They found that biomarkers indicating oxidative DNA damage were elevated. In addition, scientists also found changes in the level of blood proteins. The researchers found that the changes persisted for almost a day after exposure.

Curiously, the scientists conducted an additional test when the participants were dressed in clean clothes – no changes were observed.

According to The author of the study, a cell biologist at the University of California, Riverside, although none of the study participants experienced changes in skin or health conditions, the results of the study indicate that there is a risk of developing skin diseases in the future.

The researchers note that more research will be needed in the future to understand how third-hand smoke affects human health.