How to start exercising: scientists gave a couple of tips for those who hate training

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If the thought of lacing up your sneakers, wrapping in spandex, and doing circles, reps, and sets confuses you, just move. If you think that training camp is only for soldiers and “plyometrics” means nothing to you, just start moving.

If you need to improve your performance—not fun ones like the number of scoops you eat at a time, but serious ones like diastolic and systolic blood pressure, LDL and HDL—just get moving. This is the advice of Yi-Ming Lee, professor of epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health. T. H. Chan and Medicine at Harvard Medical School, writes ScienceBlog.

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Lee said that physical activity alone is more important for health than compulsory exercise. Just move your muscles and expend energy at your own pace. If the question is how much movement is enough to improve your health, the answer is simple – more, especially if you are already moving so little.

“Exercise is good for those who can and want to do it, but exercise alone is not necessary for better health. Any physical activity is good for health, and physical activity is what we do in our daily lives,” Li said. We don't need to exercise to reap the health benefits.” This should be good news for about a lot of us.

Only 24.2 percent of adults aged 18 and over meet the recommendations for aerobic activity and muscle strengthening. They involve 2.5 to 5 hours of moderate-intensity aerobic activity, such as brisk walking, as well as muscle-strengthening activities at least twice a week. Lee stated that the type of activity and time you devote to it depends on the primary reason for this activity. Some want to improve themselves so that a walk around the area smoothly flows into a hike in the mountains, others want to lose weight, and still others are concerned about diseases that become more frequent with age, such as diabetes, heart disease and high blood pressure.

“From couch to 5K” might be good for those who want to run 5K. When it comes to health, I would approach it very differently: the goal is just to start,” Li said.

Christina Ruggieri, an experienced clinician at the Spaulding Outpatient Center in Salem, said that if you've been sedentary for long periods of time, approach increasing your activity levels the same way you cook in a slow cooker: “slowly and without fanaticism.”

Ruggieri said the government's recommendation for physical activity is 30 minutes, five times a week, but people who have been sedentary for a long time, and COVID-19 has moved many of us into this category, should remember that 30 minutes is the general norm. physical activity per day. According to her, it's absolutely fine if you aim for a 10-minute walk a day in combination with two other 10-minute exercises.

“It's just something to increase your heart rate,” Ruggieri said. To put it simply, it shouldn't be 30 minutes of uninterrupted minutes of activity.” She says those who are long-term sedentary can even start lying down, such as doing leg raises, bridges, and band work to build strength, before rather than embarking on weight-bearing movements like deadlifts and squats.Even walking around the grocery store can be used to work on balance, such as standing on one leg while holding the handle of a cart.Aquatic therapy can also be helpful, Ruggieri says, because water helps maintain your weight, and once you start, she said, listen to your body and rest for a day if you feel tired.

“It all depends on your history of physical activity. How developed is your endurance, do you have any diseases and features of the body? Ruggeri says. If you go from zero to 100 sharply, it will probably be too fast.” She suggests trying different things until you find something you like. Some complexes have gyms, pools and exercise bikes, and a simple walk around the neighborhood or a local mall can be a good start.

“Walking is good for everyone,” said Ruggieri. If you like it, you will definitely keep doing it.”