Hurricane Ian set the sky on fire. Airbus pilot captures stunning 'St Elmo's Lights' (photo)

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Hurricane Ian set the sky on fire. Airbus pilot captures stunning St. Elmo's Lights (photo)

The flight was flying from Miami to Denver when purple lightning pierced the night sky.

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Hurricane Ian hit Florida in late September and reached Category 4 when it moved inland. As a result, the storm became the deadliest since the hurricane that hit Florida in 1935 on Labor Day, writes the Daily Mail.

Airbus pilot Louis Andress, who flew the plane and had previously observed this unusual weather phenomenon, known as the “Fires of St. Elmo”, but according to him, he had never seen “lights” of such intensity for the first time in his life.

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Andress was so impressed by what he saw that he shared the photo he took just now. The pilot notes that it was “an amazing weather show” with purple lightning piercing the night sky.

Hurricane Ian set the sky on fire. Airbus pilot captured stunning St. Elmo's Lights (photo)

Hurricane Ian set the sky on fire. Airbus pilot captured stunning St. Elmo's Fire (photo)

For the first time this unique weather phenomenon was noted by the Anglo-Saxon nobleman and sailor Gesta Hervardi back in 1110. Ultimately, the phenomenon was named after the patron saint of sailors, Saint Erasmus of Formia, also known as Saint Elmo. And the “lights” are due to the fact that the sky looks like flames are rushing through it. As a result, the phenomenon is called “St. Elmo's Fire”.

This spectacular weather phenomenon occurs during a thunderstorm, when the atmosphere is charged, and an electrical charge of plasma is created between the object and the air around it. Scientists note that the friction becomes more intense as the storm grows, resulting in powerful electric fields that are able to move clouds to the ground. After the electric field breaks the air into a plasma with a huge voltage, which in turn breaks the air molecules. And then the Fires of St. Elmo “come” – that is, a corona discharge occurs.

The St. Elmo phenomenon itself does not pose a threat, but it also means that you are surrounded by storms at the moment.

< p> Let's note that the sum of damage which was put by hurricane “Ian” is estimated at 1.1 – 1.8 billion dollars. Local authorities reported that the storm not only flooded coastal regions, but also affected settlements located in the center of the state.