Impossible to break away: James Webb photographed one of the most unusual galaxies (video)

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     Impossible to look away: James Webb captures one of the most unusual galaxies (video)

    The telescope captured a rare sight 500 million light-years away in the constellation of the Sculptor, using two tools to collect information.

    < p>Recently, the famous James Webb telescope captured the unique Cartwheel galaxy, which was created when a smaller galaxy crashed into a larger one, which caused a “cosmic tsunami” rotating at a speed of 217 km/s, writes Inverse.

    The telescope fixed a galaxy 500 million light-years away in the constellation Sculptor and used two instruments to gather information.

    Remarkably, the Cartwheel is not only beautiful, but also a very useful galaxy for science. As astronomers note, its study could help answer important questions about how galaxies transform over time. According to the Harvard and Smithsonian Centers for Astrophysics, about 25% of all galaxies currently merge with others, and even more interact gravitationally.

    The same fate awaits the Milky Way. In billions of years, it will collide and merge with Andromeda, exchanging stars with closer celestial bodies.

    The Cartwheel Galaxy boasts several interesting features:

    • Researchers call the Cartwheel a “ring galaxy”. And all because it has two rings: a bright inner and surrounding the edge of the galaxy, like a tire – the outer. Scientists describe the two rings, created by a galactic collision, like ripples in a pond after a stone has been thrown into it.
    • The inner ring is a core filled with clusters of young stars. The outer, which has expanded over about 440 million years, is dominated by supernovae and star formation.

    To detect finer details, in particular the dust wafting through the galaxy, which takes the form of outward pulling spokes during the study the Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) was used

    The MIRI data highlighted here in red complements past Hubble Space Telescope images of the galaxy to make these features more visible.

    Webb's primary camera, the Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam), provided data on blue, orange and yellow colored areas. These are places where stars are formed that look more lumpy compared to the smooth distribution or shape of older stellar populations.

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