In South Korea, miners lived in a collapsed mine on dry coffee for nine days – BBC

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 In South Korea, miners lived for nine days in a collapsed mine on dry coffee, — BBC

Elderly men built a tent from improvised means. To survive until the rescuers arrived, they had to drink water flowing from the ceiling and eat instant coffee.

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Two South Korean miners spent nine days underground after a mine collapsed in Bonhwa County. This story has become known to BBC News.

The men, aged 56 and 62, collapsed in a zinc mine at a depth of almost 200 meters, where they were working at that moment. The miners could not get out on their own, but did their best to survive in difficult conditions. They lit a fire and built a plastic tent to keep warm, and ate instant coffee to keep from starving, and drank water dripping from the ceiling.

The authorities launched a rescue operation, drilled a narrow hole, and launched a camera in order to find workers, they found themselves sitting shoulder to shoulder in a room where several mine shafts converge. On the night of November 4, rescuers dismantled the rubble, raised the victims to the surface and sent them to the hospital.

According to the niece of one of the miners, at first my uncle could not recognize her, because he spent almost ten days in the dark, covering his eyes with a special mask. After a medical examination, the doctors concluded that the miners got off lightly and would soon fully recover.

South Korean President Yoon Seok-yeol called the rescue of the miners a “miraculous” case. “Thank you and thank you again for returning safely from the crossroads of life and death,” he addressed the workers.

In May, 115 miners were stuck underground in Toretsk, Donetsk region, due to a power outage. Power outages in the Bakhmut and Kramatorsk districts began as a result of the fighting between the Armed Forces of Ukraine and the Russian army.