More Earth. Astrophotographer showed what a coronal mass ejection looks like on the Sun (video)

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More Earth. Astrophotographer showed what a coronal mass ejection looks like on the Sun (video)

According to experts, capturing these ejections and even solar flares on video is far from easy. This requires special equipment to deflect the energy and radiation emitted by the Sun.

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Astrophotographer Chuck Ayub is no stranger to captivating shots of the stars. The other day he shared his new work on several sites, taking another beautiful and at the same time terrifying video of a coronal mass ejection in our Sun, writes BGR.

Ayub shared the video on Instagram and Reddit, adding an image of the Earth to show the size of the outlier. The coronal ejection video was filmed over the course of one hour and 15 minutes. Chuck Ayub then sped up the video to about 5 seconds to add dynamics.

Coronal mass ejections like the one in this video are not uncommon in the Sun, especially during our star's current point of activity. The sun follows an 11-year solar cycle and right now it is at its peak of activity in that cycle. This is what leads to numerous solar flares and coronal mass ejections of our star.

It is worth noting that capturing these coronal mass ejections and even solar flares on video is far from easy. This requires special equipment to deflect the energy and radiation emitted by the Sun. Direct observations of the Sun through a telescope can cause permanent damage to the eyes, but specialized equipment allows astrophotographers to capture video of the Sun's activity.

Coronal mass ejections and solar flares are also extremely dangerous for the Earth. When their energy enters the Earth's magnetosphere, it can cause geomagnetic storms that can disable GPS and other communications systems. But being able to see outliers like this makes it possible to estimate the scale of flares on a star.