Neanderthals off the English Channel: researchers have found traces of an ancient hunter

Spread the love

Share

  • Neanderthals on the English Channel: researchers found traces of an ancient hunter

    send to Telegram

  • < li class="c-post__new-share__item">

    Neanderthals at La- Mansha: researchers found traces of an ancient hunter

    share on Facebook

  • Neanderthals on the English Channel: researchers found traces of an ancient hunter

    tweet

  • Neanderthals at La- Mansha: researchers found traces of an ancient hunter

    send to Viber

  • Neanderthals on the English Channel: researchers found traces of an ancient hunter

    send to Whatsapp

  • Neanderthals at La- Mansha: researchers found footprints of an ancient hunter -u-la-mansha-issledovateli-nashli-sledy-drevnego-ohotnika-977260d.png

    Archaeologists have explored the seabed of a reef off the coast of Jersey, which is only accessible for a few precious hours a day when seasonal tides are at their longest and lowest.

    last ice age, including discarded spearheads that could have been used to hunt bison, reindeer and mammoths, according to the Express.

    U Focus. Technology has its ownTelegram channel. Subscribe to keep up to date with the latest and most exciting news from the world of science!

    A group of archaeologists from the University of London College, led by Matthew Pope, studied a section of the seabed off the coast of Jersey, which “dries up” briefly during the lowest tides. Using an isolated 18th-century coastal fort a mile offshore as a base camp, they unearthed over a dozen Neanderthal stone tools from a normally submerged landscape.

    Scientists analyzed today's seabed and came up with a rough idea of ​​what the strait looked like during these dry periods. For example, Jersey – today an island – would look like a plateau on sheer cliffs. At the same time, wave-like ravines and gorges filled with sedimentary rocks covered grass and shrubs, providing both shipping routes and food for various animals. Mutilated remains of bison, mammoth and reindeer have been found in caves in Jersey, but it is still unclear whether the area was once used as a hunting ground.

    Neanderthals on the English Channel: researchers found traces of an ancient hunter

    Neanderthals at La- Mansha: researchers found traces of an ancient hunter

    According to Pope, most of these rocky landscapes are too deeply submerged for conventional archaeology: “We would have to dive or use robotic subs. It is very difficult to find such fragile evidence using these methods.” However, scientists were lucky with a place called “Violet Bank” (“Purple Spit”). This is a shallow granite reef in southwest Jersey that opens up during particularly low tides.

    Another team member, archaeologist Letty Ingri, added that being in a tower completely surrounded by the sea was extremely extreme. However, she said, “It's just you and the rest of your team in this tiny little world. The tower itself is pretty cozy. There's a fire, there's a kitchen, we ate well. It had electricity from solar panels, so I felt quite self-sufficient. That there were excellent working conditions”.

    The researchers did not search blindly, but first turned to local experts who had already studied the area for information. The team spent 4 days this May venturing out of the Seymour Tower and scanning the ground for stone tools and taking rock samples for dating. At the same time, drones were flying over the ground, mapping the usually flooded area.

    Neanderthals at La- Mansha: researchers found footprints of an ancient hunter sledy-drevnego-ohotnika-93b1724.jpg

    In total, scientists managed to recover about two dozen finds from the Purple Spit. According to them, the most valuable among them is the tip of the spear, known as the “point of Levallois”. These were commonly used by Neanderthals for hunting. Researchers believe these finds are clear evidence that ancient hunters once used the area around the hunt, and there are even more artifacts hidden on the seabed. Thanks to the safe and meaningful archaeological work that is possible on the coastal plains at low tide and high tide, scientists are going to explore not only the entire reef, but also take the first steps on some other reefs in the English Channel region.