Not everything is so clear. Gardeners were offered to find a common language with slugs

Spread the love

Share

  • Not everything is so simple. Gardeners were offered to find a common language with slugs

    send to Telegram

  • Not everything is so simple. Gardeners were offered to find a common language with slugs

    share on Facebook

  •  Not everything is so simple. Gardeners were invited to find a common language with slugs

    tweet

  • Not everything is so simple. slugs

    send to Viber

  •  Not everything is so simple. Gardeners were offered to find a common language with slugs

    send to Whatsapp

  • Not everything is so simple. Gardeners were asked to find a common tongue with slugs

    send to Messenger

Not everything is so simple. Gardeners were offered to find a common language with slugs

Scientists no longer believe that all slugs and snails are bad, and therefore advised gardeners to come to terms with them.

Related video

The advisers of the Royal Horticultural Society have issued an unprecedented statement – slugs and snails are not our enemies, and therefore gardeners should try to get along peacefully with them, writes the Daily Mail.

U Focus. Technology has its own Telegram channel. Subscribe so you don't miss the latest and exciting news from the world of science!

Today, scientists advise British gardeners, of whom there are about 600,000 in the country, to come to terms with life next to slugs and snails. The researchers note that gardeners will apparently have to put up with some damage caused by these mollusks, but their reputation is cleared. Scientists no longer consider snails and slugs to be pests.

Gardeners have also been advised to manually remove these mollusks from their crops, supposedly not only to get rid of them, but also to provide some sedatives. Like, what could be more meditative than picking shellfish by hand.

Note that this year, due to the dry summer, gardeners met fewer slugs. Scientists believe that this is due to the fact that they moved underground. However, the move to end the fight against snails and slugs with the help of chemicals, according to the researchers, should serve as an impetus for the restoration of nature in the UK.

In addition, the researchers advised the British to come to terms with sun-bleached lawns. Scientists believe that the time has come to save water, which means that the priority should not be a beautiful green lawn, but reasonable consumption and saving resources.