Orgy after the premiere of “Snow White”. Secrets of the Disney studio for its centenary

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Today, Disney World is associated with a magical park and numerous films and cartoons, but at the dawn of its creation, the studio was a very scandalous place.

Disney's magical film studio turns 100 years old, but it also holds a lot of dirty secrets, such as an orgy after the premiere of the iconic “Snow White” and numerous accusations of sexism and racism. The Daily Mail writes about it.

Disney Studios, whose name is associated with cartoons and family entertainment, celebrates its centenary this year with a series of celebrations called “Disney 100”.

It will include an “exciting, multi-sensory experience” called “The Miracle of Friendship,” but those 100 years have not always been completely miraculous or even particularly friendly.

One day in Kansas City, Missouri, a boy was proposed get a haircut for free. This was the first event in a chain of events that made him one of the most famous people in the world, as synonymous with fairy tales as Hans Christian Andersen.

Because a free haircut was offered in exchange for a selection of drawings by a 12-year-old boy who developed an early talent for drawing. They graced the local barbershop and soon became a local landmark.

This early recognition of his artistic talent sparked ambition in a boy named Walt Disney, and by the age of 20 he was a full-time animator with his own production company called Laugh-O -Gram Films.

But it was the company he founded in Hollywood in 1923 under his own name that made him a fortune.

He was a unique visionary who changed pop culture not only in the US, but around the world. As one studio publicist once put it, Walt Disney became “better known than Confucius in China and Shakespeare in England.”

But Disney's commercial trajectory was by no means smooth sailing. His business acumen did not match his drawing skills, and Laugh-O-Gram went bankrupt, despite the fact that two seven-minute films inspired by the fairy tales “Puss in Boots” and “Little Red Riding Hood” were released nationally.

Disney traveled to Los Angeles, where his older brother Roy worked as a vacuum cleaner salesman.

Disney biographer Neil Gabler wrote, “Walt was made for Hollywood. He liked to dress up and pretend, was loud, outgoing and craved attention.” .

In October 1923, with a loan, he and Roy founded the Disney Brothers cartoon studio. The more commercially astute Roy ran the business; Walt was the creative inspiration.

Another key figure in this story was Walt's friend from Missouri, Ub Iwerks, the son of a German immigrant. Iwerks was a better animator than Walt, but a mild-mannered man who Walt constantly teased.

Worse, Walt never gave him credit for his most famous creation: Mickey Mouse.

Mickey was born in 1928 after Walt lost the rights to his most successful cartoon character, Oswald the Lucky Rabbit, due to a dispute with producer Charles Mintz, and urgently needed a replacement.

Over time, a legend has developed that Mickey (originally called Mortimer) was entirely his concept, inspired by a house mouse that Disney kept in Kansas City.

This wonderful story is not true.

In fact, the iconic cartoon mouse was the result of a brainstorming session between Walt and his animators. Walt's original drawing wasn't very good, so Iwerks reworked it and then animated Steamboat Willie (1928), the first cartoon with fully synchronized sound.

It was a huge success. Walt himself voiced Mickey in a squeaky voice, taking almost all the credit for himself, and soon both Disney and Mickey became known throughout the world. Walt felt deeply betrayed when an angry Iverks left the company. The extravagant animation costs were almost prohibitive, and when other studios released Mickey look-alikes, Disney was forced to sue them to protect their first superstar.

But hit followed hit and a host of wildly popular new characters emerged, including Pluto, Goofy and Donald Duck. Walt even opened a small private zoo at the studio so that his animators could study the movements of animals.

In 1935, with 500 people on staff, he was ready to make the feature film Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.

Snow White, released in 1937, was a huge critical and commercial success, cementing Disney's place in British and American cultural life.

By that time, he was already married to Lillian Bounds, who worked in his company as a secretary. They were together until Disney's death in 1966, but the marriage was not a happy one.

In London, “Snow White” ran in theaters without a break for 28 weeks.

When the cartoon reached the provinces, cinemas were forced to take orders three weeks in advance.

Following the success of Snow White, Walt Disney hosted a lavish weekend in Palm Springs for employees, eventually dubbed the Snow White Orgy. The party became famous for unbridled sex and seas of alcohol. One employee jumped from the roof of the hotel into the pool, another rode his horse into the lobby of the hotel.

Animator and director Bill Justice once recalled: “Swimming suits flew out of the windows. There were naked bathing parties, people got drunk and were often surprised what room they are in and who they had sex with when they woke up in the morning.”

Pinocchio (1940), Dumbo (1941) and Bambi (1942) followed. The company, now renamed Walt Disney Productions, more than doubled in size, but Walt Disney paid his animators the bare minimum.

When Pinto Colvig, the voice of Goofy, Pluto and the two dwarfs, complained about being underpaid, Walt fired him.

The result was a full-blown strike by the animators who disrupted the production of Dumbo. The strikers demanded the right to join a trade union; Walt branded them communist agitators and retaliated by painting them in Dumbo as caricatured evil circus clowns.

He was especially annoyed that one of his best animators, Art Babbitt, who came up with Goofy and the Evil Queen in Snow White, was leading the strike.

In the end, Walt was forced to compromise: he allowed his animators to unionize and agreed to change the salary structure. But he never forgave the strikers, accusing them of “breaking the spirit” of the studio.

But these scandals have not stopped Disney from releasing live-action films, starting with Treasure Island in 1950, and, unlike most film studios, to gain a foothold in the newfangled environment of television.

And in 1955, he found the energy for his other grand project: the world's first Disneyland theme park, which opened in Anaheim, California. that it was an extremely racist and sexist place. So, in “Dumbo” the crow was even called Jim Crow, in honor of the set of laws that imposed racial segregation in the US South.

And for years he refused to hire female animators, saying they had no talent. The company even had a prepared letter that they sent to every woman who dreams of becoming an animator. “Women do not engage in any creative work related to the preparation of cartoons for the screen, since this work is carried out exclusively by young men,” the letter said. Disney stopped inviting his wife Lillian to the ceremony, believing that she brings him bad luck, and he forbade his daughters to watch their own cartoons, citing the fact that they would not laugh loudly enough at them.

Nevertheless, for all his many faults, Walt was undeniably a genius, perhaps unmatched before or since, in the entertainment industry.

His death in 1966 from cancer hit the company hard. By the way, despite the legends that Walt was frozen and someday can be brought back to life, they are not true. He rests in Forest Lawn Cemetery.

However, after the death of Disney, his empire still gets into scandals. So, in 2016, an alligator killed a two-year-old visitor to Disneyland. In 2001, it was revealed that Disney had partnered with 14 Chinese toy factories where women and children under 14 worked 16-hour days for pennies

And about the low wages of Disneyland workers and the exhausting The mode of operation is already legendary. Last year, one former employee who has played many Disney princesses was candid about her work.

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