Pig referees. Scientists have learned why pigs can not get past the fight of relatives (video)

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Pig referees. Scientists have discovered why pigs can not get past the fight of relatives (video)

The study shows that the third piglet will either try to calm the victim with hugs, or reduce the aggressor's ardor.< /p> Related video

You may not have noticed, but pigs never get past a kin fight. No, they will not jump into the fray to add “fire”, but rather try to reduce the intensity of passions, writes the Daily Mail.

Scientists Giada Cordoni, Ivan Norsha and their colleagues from the University of Turin in Italy were interested in such “sensitivity” of piglets and they decided to find out what is really happening.

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During the study, scientists observed how more than a hundred pigs resolved conflicts after a fight. For six months, scientists observed the piglets and recorded the interactions between them.

They found that the aggressive behavior of the pigs was accompanied by headbutting, pushing, biting, and even lifting the prey. However, three minutes after the end of the conflict, the pigs showed reconciliation, such as nose-to-nose contact, sitting with each other, or leaning their heads against the other. It is curious that the aggressor and the victim were equally the initiators of reconciliation.

In the course of observations, scientists noticed that the third passer-by pig cannot simply walk past the conflict and will definitely stick its heel into it. However, there are two different behaviors – in one of the cases, the observer pig can approach the victim, in the other – to the aggressor.

Scientists have concluded that the observer pig or tries to calm the victim with so-called hugs, pressing it to the floor. It is curious that the aggressor will continue his attacks, but the victim will feel a little better, for example, they stop shaking, scratching, yawning and chewing with an empty mouth – all these are signs of anxiety. If the onlooker pig approaches the aggressor rather than the victim, the intensity of the conflict will subside slightly – the number of attacks directed at the victim decreases.

Researchers also noticed that bystanders are more willing to intervene in the conflict if they have close ties with the aggressor or victim. It is assumed that pigs value certain relationships and are able to maintain close relatives.

In the future, scientists intend to find out whether such conflict resolution strategies work in all pigs or only in this group.