Rare guest. In July, a comet with a giant tail will fly past the Earth

A rare visitor. In July, a comet with a giant tail will fly past the Earth

Thus, the comet is the most distant and at the same time the most active comet ever seen at a distance of 2.4 billion km from the Sun .

Five years ago, the Hubble Space Telescope spotted a large comet as it approached the Sun between the orbits of Saturn and Uranus. This comet has become the record holder, which was recognized as the most distant and at the same time the most active comet ever seen at a distance of 2.4 billion km from the Sun, writes Cnet.

As astronomers note, this giant ice ball is about to will approach Earth in a few weeks. Comet C/2017 K2 will be at its closest point to Earth when it passes through the inner solar system on July 14.

However, even at this distance, it will be farther from us than the average distance between Earth and Mars. Therefore, it will be difficult to see the comet without the help of at least a small telescope.

According to scientists, there is great uncertainty about the size of the comet's nucleus, with different observations suggesting a width of 18 to 161 km. The size of the dusty tail of the comet, as shown by early observations, has a width of 130,000 to 800,000 km. For example, Jupiter's equatorial and polar radii are 71,492 km and 66,854 km, respectively.

After passing C/2017 in July, K2 will continue to fly towards the Sun throughout the year, reaching its closest point in December. Whatever happens, this visit will probably be our only chance to get to know this comet. Its orbit is so long that it will not return for several million years.

But in April, astronomers announced that the legendary Comet Leonard or C/2021 A1 broke apart during its closest approach to the Sun.< /p>

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