Real talkers. Scientists discover that turtles and caecilians can talk (audio)

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 Real talkers. Scientists have found that turtles and caecilians can talk (audio)

Research shows that they inherited this skill from an ancestor who lived more than 400 million years ago.

Related video < p>For a long time, scientists believed that turtles, fish and budgerigars, or, as they are also called caecilians, do not know how to talk, and therefore they were placed in a separate group called choanates, writes IFL Science.

Hoanates are a group of aquatic and semi-aquatic animals whose nose and height are arranged in such a way that it allows them to breathe by sticking their nostrils out of the water. Previously, scientists assumed that these animals are not capable of making sounds, but the authors of the new study questioned the hypothesis.

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During the study, they studied dozens of different types of choanates and came to the conclusion that at least 53 of them can definitely talk. This includes almost all species of turtles, wavy worms and South American lungfish.

Scientists have found that turtles can not only make noise, but also have, in principle, a fairly wide range of vocalizations, and some species are able to make over 15 different sounds. These sounds are used by them in different situations, including during the manifestation of parental care.

The scientists then collected all the recorded sounds and combined them with phylogenetic trait reconstruction models – in this way, the researchers hoped to find one common ancestor that transferred this skill to noisy vertebrates. Careful analysis showed that these species still have a common ancestor and probably lived on the planet about 407 million years ago.

Scientists believe that their study not only disproved the hypothesis that choanates are not can talk, but also showed how important it is to fill in the gaps with studies of little-studied species.