'Scary' image of the Pillars of Creation unveiled by NASA

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A “scaring” image of the Pillars of Creation unveiled by NASA

This image of the Pillars of Creation was obtained through mid-infrared observations by Webb's MIRI instrument .

To mark Halloween, NASA released a second image of the Pillars of Creation taken by the Webb Space Telescope, this time captured using the MIRI instrument.

The ghostly image shows these huge structures of gas and dust teeming with forming stars in a darker light than that unveiled in mid-October by NASA that had been captured by the NIRCam instrument.

Located 6,500 light years from Earth in the Eagle Nebula, the Pillars of Creation were made famous by the Hubble Space Telescope, which captured some a first shot in 1995, revisited in 2014.

The Pillars of Creation span 4-5 light years, while the nebula itself is 55-70 light years wide.

Comparison of images taken by the Hubble (left) and James Webb telescopes of the Pillars of Creation located 6,500 light-years from Earth, in the Milky Way.

The mid-infrared light captured by MIRI can reveal darker matter such as dust, but it is still possible to observe some young stars that have not still stripped of their coat of dust. These are the purple shapes around the edge of the pillars.

This image of The Pillars of Creation was obtained through mid-infrared observations by the Webb's MIRI instrument.

The densest areas of dust appear in the darkest shades of gray. The upward red region is where the dust is most diffused, NASA explains in a statement.

In this image, it is impossible to see the galaxies in the background, since the interstellar medium in the densest part of the Milky Way disk is bloated with gas and dust that does not allow distant light to penetrate.

The James Webb Space Telescope was launched on December 25 and began its science mission in July. It was designed to observe the outer reaches of the cosmos even further than ever before.

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