Scientists are at a loss. In Mongolia, a terrible something made sheep walk in circles for dozens of days (video)

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Scientists are at a loss. In Mongolia, a terrible something made sheep walk in circles for dozens of days (video)

Strange animal behavior was noticed by sheep breeders, and scientists cannot understand what's the matter.

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An eerie video of the movement of sheep in a circle appeared on the Web at the end of November. For more than a week, netizens have been pondering what could have made the animals move in this way, scientists later joined in, but, alas, there is still no convincing answer, writes Science Alert.

At the time of release, the video began to move continuously in a circle for 10 days now, which greatly frightened the owners of the farm. However, after a while, the animals did not stop, it is known that they were in motion in a circle for more than 12 days, but perhaps this continues even now.

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One of the possible theories for such a creepy movement of sheep could be that the sheep entered a death loop, as ants sometimes do.

According to the second theory, ruminants suffer from “circular disease”, which causes them to constantly move in circles. “Circular disease” is a disease caused by soil bacteria that can infect one half of the brain, causing a tilt to one side. However, this theory has its inconsistencies – firstly, as a rule, ring-shaped disease affects only a certain percentage of sheep, and not the entire herd, and secondly, infected animals die in just a few days.

Note that the owners farms and local media do not specify how the sheep ate, drank, or defecated while on the move. Some sources claim that the herd still continues to walk in circles.

According to livestock expert Emma Doyle at the University of New England in Armidale, Australia, when she watched the video, her first thought was, “I've never seen sheep behave like this.” Doyle also noted that the video looks like an installation, as if something was put in the middle to prevent the sheep from entering.

However, Matt Bell, an agricultural scientist from Hartpury University in England, does not consider this video a hoax. According to him, after the sheep stay in the paddock for a long time, they can get frustrated and walk in circles.

The researcher notes that this is a fairly common symptom observed in wild animals that are kept in captivity. This condition is called zoochosis and can lead to repetitive animal behavior that does not serve a specific purpose, such as wandering in circles. The scientist also notes that animal health is able to spread among herd animals, like a kind of virus.

The owners of the farm note that new individuals joined the group of sheep every day. However, this behavior was observed only in one paddock, while other paddocks in the same area behaved in the usual way.

By the way, the researchers remembered another eerie event that happened last year in East Sussex. Then the photo captured how the sheep calmly and motionless stood inside a perfectly formed circle. However, then it turned out that the owner simply scattered the animal feed in rings, as a result of which the herd huddled in a circle. Alas, in the case of sheep in Mongolia, there is no such simple explanation.