Scientists have introduced new units of measurement: it turned out that the Earth weighs 6 ronnagrams

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Scientists have introduced new units of measurement: it turned out that the Earth weighs 6 ronnagrams

The International System of Units (SI) has new metric prefixes for known units of measurement.

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Scientists and representatives of governments from around the world who gathered at the 27th General Conference on Weights and Measures, held at the Palace of Versailles, near Paris, voted to adopt new metric prefixes in the International System of Units (SI), writes ScienceAlert.

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Back in 1960, the International System of Units (SI) was created, which is designed to standardize the entire metric system. To express large or vice versa small values, prefixes for units of measure are used. For example, let's take the unit of weight – grams. We add the prefix kilo to it and we get a kilogram, that is, 1000 grams. After all, saying a kilogram is much easier than, for example, saying 70 thousand grams when measuring your weight.

But over these 60 years, the need for the emergence of more and more new prefixes for known measurement values ​​has grown significantly, because science does not stand still and humanity needs designations either for huge measurement values ​​that have tens of zeros after one, or very small values, with dozens of zeros before one.

The last time scientists added new prefixes was back in 1991 and they were zetta and yotta. A zetta is a one followed by 21 zeros, and a yotta is a one followed by 24 zeros. For example, a zettameter is 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 m.

Now, in the International System of Units (SI), the prefixes ronna and quetta (to denote large quantities), as well as ronto and quecto (to denote very small quantities) have appeared. For example, 1 ronnameter is a unit with 27 zeros, and a quettameter is a unit with 30 zeros. But if the value is very small, then rontometers and quactometers can be used for this. The result is the same as with the previous values, only the zeros will be before the one.

Scientists introduced new units of measurement: it turned out that the Earth weighs 6 ronnagrams

Scientists have introduced new units of measurements: it turned out that the Earth weighs 6 ronnagrams

The National Physical Laboratory of Great Britain, which actually initiated the changes, played a leading role in introducing new units of measurement into the metric system.

According to Richard Brown from the National Physical Laboratory of Great Britain, the previous prefixes were no longer enough to designate an increasing amount of data, as well as to denote ultra-small values.

“Yottabyte data measurements have reached the limit, there are many more. On the other hand, ultra-small values ​​​​have appeared in particle physics as well. And they also need new values,” says Brown.

< img class="aligncenter" src="/wp-content/uploads/2022/11/uchenye-vveli-novye-edinicy-izmerenij-okazalos-chto-zemlja-vesit-6-ronnagrammov-1b9285c.jpg" alt="Scientists introduced new units of measurement: it turned out that the Earth weighs 6 ronnagrams" />

 Scientists have introduced new units of measurement: it turned out that the Earth weighs 6 ronnagrams

According to Brown, the new prefixes can be used for any quantities. Scientists have calculated that our planet weighs, it would seem, only 6 ronnagrams, but in fact it is a six with 27 zeros after it. At the same time, Jupiter is naturally heavier, and its weight, according to the new units of measurement, is 2 kettagrams, or a two followed by 30 zeros.

According to Brown, the idea that new prefixes should be introduced arose from -because some companies, such as Google, are already using unauthorized value prefixes to refer to huge amounts of data – brontobytes and gellabytes.

Scientists believe that new prefixes will help meet the growing need for large values ​​for the following about 25 years.

As Focus already wrote, scientists named the city on Earth, which is the largest in the world in terms of population and area.