Scotty the T-Rex comes to life in augmented reality at the Royal Saskatchewan Museum

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Scotty the T-Rex comes to life in augmented reality at the Royal Saskatchewan Museum

“When you see the skeleton in real life, it's pretty impressive, but when you see it in flesh and blood, it's pretty scary,” says the head of exhibitions and programming at the Royal Saskatchewan Museum. , John Snell.

In Dinovember, Dinosaur Month, the Royal Saskatchewan Museum is bringing a fun new approach this year . Visitors will be able to bring Scotty, the largest tyrannosaur ever discovered, anywhere thanks to augmented reality.

To do this, users simply scan a QR code with a smart phone to see the famous dinosaur appear. This code can be found on the museum's pamphlet as well as on its website.

You press the button to start the augmented reality model. Your camera will scan the ground to see where the correct location is and then it will place the dinosaur there, says model developer Marc Toews.

And one of the nice things about it is that you're able to take photos and videos with Scotty, adds this tech autodidact.

The virtual version of Scotty is 14 meters tall.

For the Head of Exhibitions and Programming at the Royal Saskatchewan Museum, John Snell, the virtual version of Scotty fits perfectly into their Dinovember activities.

When you see the skeleton in real life, it's pretty impressive, but when you see it in flesh and blood, it's pretty scary, says John Snell.

An augmented reality version of the tyrannosaurus for the T. rex Discovery Center in Eastend, Saskatchewan will also be on public display next summer.

So there are two different versions of the dinosaur: the one we have at the museum where Scotty roars, and the one at the T. rex Discovery Center where Scotty prowls around, ready to hunt you, adds Mr. Snell.

The Royal Saskatchewan Museum has also collaborated with another augmented reality designer to offer smaller versions of a Tyrannosaurus, Triceratops and Edmontosaurus.

You can put them on your hand or desktop using your phone. They move and you can, when you touch them on the phone, make them roar and run, says John Snell.

As part of Dinovember, the museum also hosts interactive activities, a story hour on Mondays, and a family drop-in program on Saturdays.

Visitors are encouraged to wear their best dinosaur attire in the museum to enter a raffle for a chance to win a prize.

With information from Scott Larson

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