Secrets of the Han Dynasty. The tomb of the deposed emperor revealed the greatness of the era

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Secrets of the Han Dynasty. The tomb of the deposed emperor revealed the greatness of the era

The discovery of gold items and valuable relics tells another story of Emperor Liu He.

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Liu He was the Emperor of the Han Dynasty of China during the Yuanping era . Initially, he was the ruler of Chania. He was later appointed emperor by the minister Huo Guang in 74 BC. e.

After 27 days, he was overthrown from the throne. In addition, he was excluded from the official list of emperors. In total, palace officials cited 1,127 instances of misconduct as evidence for impeachment, writes Heritage Daily.

The former emperor was forced to live in exile, where he died at 33. This happened in 59 BC. By himself, Liu He left 16 wives and 22 children. He was buried in the tomb of Marquis Haihong, located in the northern part of Xinjiang in Jiangsu.

Archaeologists discovered it in 2011. During the excavations, about 20,000 artifacts were found. His tomb is one of the best-preserved Western Han Dynasty (206 BC – 24 AD) tombs ever found. It has a holistic structure, clear planning and a complete system of sacrifices. It contains the largest number of relics with the best variety and craftsmanship in Jiangsu.

Among the relics, including gold, bronze and jade artifacts, archaeologists discovered a broken lacquer screen in the main room of the tomb and restored two portraits. One of these is believed to be the earliest portrait of Confucius ever found in China. More than 5,000 bamboo sheets of Confucian classics have also been excavated, indicating the prevalence of Confucius's teachings over 2,000 years ago. The Qi version of the Analects of Confucius, which was lost about 1800 years ago, has been found in unearthed bamboo leaves.

Such vicissitudes could deprive him of imperial glory, but the relics dug from his tomb tell a different story. The find of gold objects is the most isolated piece ever found in a Han Dynasty tomb. It reveals the grandeur of the lineage and points to the dynasty's considerable gold reserves.

It is also the only tomb with a chariot burial site in the south of the Yangtze River. Five well-preserved horse-drawn vehicles were found, each containing four sacrificed horses, indicating that the owner belonged to the upper echelons of the Han Dynasty.

Liu, the Marquis, was the grandson of Emperor Wu, whose reign started the prosperity of the Han Dynasty, which is believed to have been the same as that of the first emperor of the Qin Dynasty.

“In order to learn about Emperor Qing and his dynasty through archaeological artifacts, one can go to the Terracotta Army. However, Haihunhou Tomb did not have many artifacts for in-depth study of Emperor Wu,” said Yang Jun , a researcher at the Institute of Cultural Relics and Archeology of Jiangxi Province and a leading archaeologist.