Suitable for study and work. Two effective techniques will help you remember information

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Useful for study and work. Two effective techniques will help you remember information

Forgetting is a natural process, but scientists believe there are at least two ways to slow it down.

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Whether you're trying to pass an exam or learn a new skill, memory can play tricks on you. However, this will not happen if you familiarize yourself with the two strategies that scientists recommend, writes Sci Tech Daily.

According to lead author of the study, Iowa State psychology professor Shana Carpenter, a combination of interval practice and search practice is the key to success. , if you need to pass an exam, learn a new skill, or just memorize an array of information.

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In their research, Carpenter and colleagues describe intervals as a method of continuous learning. In fact, this is completely contrary to the strategy of studying on the eve of the exam. For example, in one experiment, researchers gave exams to medical students two weeks after training and a year later. It turned out that future surgeons who were retrained for three weeks showed better results in both cases.

According to Carpenter, there is no fixed interval between retraining – research shows that repetition of information after how part of it was forgotten, but not all, is useful for remembering.

The second technique for remembering information is the practice of retrieval, an approach that involves remembering past learning. The researchers note that, in fact, it can manifest itself in various formats – whether it be flashcards, practical exams or written prompts. All this can help to identify gaps in knowledge. It turned out that those who check their answers for errors or receive immediate feedback tend to learn better.

Scientists analyzed more than 200 studies and concluded that people remember more information using tests, flashcards and prompts than those that do not include searching – for example, rereading a textbook.

In addition, studies have shown that people who combine the two techniques, intervals and search practice, have the highest chance of remembering information. Forgetting is a natural process, Carpenter says, and people can't stop forgetting. However, by practicing reminding and spacing, we can significantly slow down forgetting.

According to Carpenter, their research is meant to dispel the myth that learning has to be easier to work with. However, studies show that rereading a textbook is unlikely to bring much benefit – writing an essay or taking tests will be much more useful for memorization. Carpenter believes that without knowledge testing, which includes the practice of recall, we are more likely to be drawn into the “illusion of learning” than to actually remember the information.

The researchers suggest that these two techniques are not widely used due to the fact that many do not like to make mistakes or realize that they do not remember information as well as they thought. As a result, unwillingness to face unpleasant emotions can lead to even greater problems – for example, a student will sooner or later have to face an exam and it would be better to be ready for it.

Carpenter notes that she herself actively uses search practices and intervals in their university courses, such as online practice quizzes or clicker questions. And it really does work.

For example, researchers conducted an experiment in elementary school math classes. A few days after the fractions lesson, the teacher asked the students to share what they remember about fractions. In an open conversation, the more students remembered from the previous lesson, the more they remembered.

According to Carpenter, this technique will be useful not only for students and students, but will also be useful for teachers and teachers, as well as people who are learning something new.