The FCFA calls for an additional $300 million for the survival of Francophone organizations outside Quebec

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The FCFA is calling for $300M more for the survival of Francophone organizations outside Quebec

The FCFA is asking the federal government for an additional $300 million in the next Action Plan for Official Languages.(Archives)

< p class="e-p">Francophone organizations working in minority settings need more help from the federal government than ever. Otherwise, many of them will certainly disappear, says the Federation of Francophone and Acadian Communities (FCFA).

Many Francophone organizations in minority settings are at risk of closure.

The Federation of Francophone and Acadian Communities (FCFA) says that many of them are approaching the breaking point.

A study carried out on behalf of the FCFA shows that the pandemic and the inflation of recent months have only worsened a situation that has been going on for years, putting some organizations before heartbreaking choices on the budgetary level.< /p>

The FCFA is launching a real cry from the heart on Wednesday. The Federation is calling for an additional $300 million from the federal government to ensure the survival of these essential organizations in communities across the country.

The FCFA is asking the federal government to include this additional investment in the next Action Plan for Official Languages ​​2023-2028. FCFA president Liane Roy expects the federal government to make decisions by December. This plan must be a recovery plan for the Francophonie, she said.

Liane Roy declares that the organizations have the will and the know-how to deliver services, but not the capacity.

The FCFA conducted a study of 188 Francophone organizations in minority settings in Canada. It paints a grim picture of their reality: understaffed and exhausted, uncompetitive salaries, recruitment difficulties.

The vast majority of these organizations say they do not have sufficient funding to fulfill their mission. This strong feeling of precariousness is felt by Francophone organizations in minority communities in all regions of the country.

“We knew that there was a deep evil in our organisms. »

— Liane Roy, President of the Federation of Francophone and Acadian Communities

For two decades, institutions and organizations have been doing more with less, sums up the President, that we ask them to accept as normal a general manager's salary below the Canadian standard for a schedule of 60 hours per week.

The general manager of the FCFA insists on the importance for Francophone communities in the middle minority to receive more realistic funding.

“It shouldn't be a sacrifice, working for a community organization, where you have to choose between good working conditions, and the Francophone cause. »

— Alain Dupuis, Executive Director of the Federation of Francophone and Acadian Communities

The government has an obligation to support the development of our communities, and to support institutions in key sectors, reminds the president of the FCFA. The federation is calling for $300 million, or $280 million to increase core funding for Francophone organizations and $20 million in an innovation fund for these organizations.

L& #x27;The future will be extremely difficult for these organizations without adequate financial support, predicts the FCFA.

The president of the federation expects the coming months and years be difficult for several key players in a minority setting. We can see on the horizon a very plausible scenario of closure of Francophone organizations.

Liane Roy continues: It will happen because they will no longer be able to fill positions or to offer decent wages, or because service cuts will cause them to lose the public.

“It's not science -fiction, and it's not far in the future.

—Liane Roy, President of the Federation of Francophone and Acadian Communities

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