The Green Party, Climat Québec or Bloc Montréal: Are Third Parties Visible Enough? | Elections Quebec 2022

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The Green Party, Climate Quebec or Bloc Montreal: are the third parties visible enough? | Élections Quebec 2022

In addition to the five main political parties, some twenty parties are active in publicizing their candidates and their ideas. Of this number, the Green Party of Quebec and Climat Quebec, dedicated to the environmental cause, and the Bloc Montreal which wishes to make the metropolis shine more.

< source srcset="https://images.radio-canada.ca/q_auto,w_960/v1/ici-tele/jeunesse/16x9/urne-election-vote-quebec-main-democratie-voter-jeune -child-grass.jpg" media="(min-width: 0px) and (max-width: 99999px)"/>

Third parties field 242 candidates, nearly 30% of the total number of candidates running in the October 3 general election.

It was the night of the leaders' debate at Radio-Canada. Outside, through the heavy security, pressure groups and activists demonstrated with placards and banners to the sound of the music of the Fringants Cowboys.

Among them was the leader of the Green Party of Quebec, Alex Tyrrell. With others, he calls for a reform of the voting system. His party won nearly 2% of the vote in the general election of October 2018. If we had had an absolute proportional system, we would have won two seats in the National Assembly and even more if we considers strategic voting, he argues.

He denounces, by the same token, the presence of the leader of the Conservative Party of Quebec at the leaders' debate.

“That doesn't make sense!” The Green Party of Quebec received more votes than the Conservative Party in the last election. Despite this, his leader is in the debate, while I am in the street, on the sidewalk, answering questions. »

— Leader of the Green Party of Quebec, Alex Tyrrell

In the center, the leader of the Green Party of Quebec, Alex Tyrrell and the deputy leader, Halimatou Bah, surrounded by candidates during the march for the climate.

The leader of the Greens also criticizes the lack of media coverage. It is deplorable, there has been no article on the Green Party in the media as we have reached the 25th day of the electoral campaign, he claims.

In 2018, his party obtained nearly 9,000 votes more than the Conservative Party of Quebec, but the latter was able to enter the National Assembly when the former CAQ member Claire Samson joined the party.

>

According to political scientist and professor of political science at the University of Quebec in Outaouais, Thomas Collombat, it gave the Conservative Party greater visibility: From the moment you set foot in the Blue Room, the media and the x27;the electorate no longer look at you the same way. Having a member of the National Assembly gave him a different status, a different audience and made it possible for him to get in the game.

Listen to the report by Karine Mateu on the show L'L'heure du monde on ICI Première.

In the middle of the election campaign, marches for the climate were held all over the world, including one in Montreal. A favorite place for the Green Party of Alex Tyrrell, who was there with several of his candidates, but also for Climat Québec led by Martine Ouellet.

The former PQ minister and former leader of the Bloc Québécois managed to recruit 54 candidates across the province. Created last year, his party is also entirely dedicated to the environmental cause. We created Climat Québec because the whole political offer was not at all suitable. She was not up to solving the climate crisis. The walkers will encourage decision-makers to take radical action. There is a radical action accessible to citizens: it is to completely change the political class, supports the leader.

Martine Ouellet, leader of the Climat Québec party and candidate in Marie-Victorin. His party has 54 candidates.

According to her, even if the major parties include measures related to the environment in their electoral platforms, they remain unable to stand up to the big polluters.

“The five parties are incapable of dealing with economic lobbies and the issue that best illustrates this is the [ Foundry] Horne. »

— The head of Climat Québec, Martine Ouellet

Even Québec solidaire wants to keep the Horne open, while the plant sprays poison, arsenic, on the heads of citizens. He is on his knees and yet he is only in opposition, she laments.

Despite everything, it is not easy for the Green Party and Climat Québec to stand out in the current election, believes political scientist Thomas Collombat.

These issues [such as the environment], which are usually carried by third parties, are present in the main debate, so the media and the electorate have less interest in third parties . Moreover, what is interesting is that Québec solidaire, like the parties that preceded it, were for a long time these small parties which tried to make themselves heard in the polls, which tried to invite them into the debates, which were trying to elect certain deputies, he underlines.

In the west of Montreal, at the corner of Sherbrooke and Gray streets, the signs of Balarama Holness, leader of Bloc Montreal, are clearly visible. The former football player, who made a name for himself at the municipal level by running for mayor of Montreal, this time launched himself into the provincial arena. Just as the Bloc Québécois does for Quebec in Ottawa, Bloc Montreal wants to defend the metropolis in the National Assembly.

“You don't have to be just a creature from Quebec. You need to be recognized, have more autonomy, more powers and more financial resources. »

— Bloc Montreal leader Balarama Holness

Montreal has a lot of potential, but it can't afford it right now, laments the leader.

From left to right: the candidate in Saint-Henri–Sainte-Anne, Janusz Kaczorowsky, the candidate in Westmount–St-Louis, Heidi Small, and the leader of Bloc Montréal and candidate in Notre-Dame-de-Grâce, Balarama Holness .

With two of his candidates, Heidi Small, in Westmount–St-Louis, and Janusz Kaczorowski, in Saint-Henri-Sainte-Anne, the leader distributes leaflets and talks with passers-by. The reception is good and people are smiling and polite. By chance, two people confide that they will vote for Heidi, who is delighted. She who lives in the neighborhood believes that proximity to voters makes the difference: I'm from here, it's a very different experience. I do everything in Westmount: I buy clothes, I go to the fishmonger, the butcher, the doctor, everything. I am, here, every day.

Janusz adds: I think Montreal is really special. We have a multicultural, multiethnic spirit. I feel like a Montrealer first and foremost, he says proudly.

The important thing is the quality of the candidates and not the number, defends Balarama Holness, whose party has only 13. We could have had post candidates, he says, but rather, it was decided that each candidate would have resources. I would rather elect four out of 13 candidates than none out of 50!

Like the leader of the Green Party, he feels that the media does not give enough space to small parties, but also stigmatizes them. We have an interesting platform on health, education, but the media does not take them and characterizes us as an Anglophone party that manifests. Yes, we are against law 96, but not against French. It can be dangerous. I have received death threats in the past. We have to be careful, he pleads.

For Thomas Collombat, it is interesting for a small party to target a particular issue, but its expansion then remains limited, as does its weight within a majority government. That being said, according to him, all these third parties can have an influence on the outcome of the vote: Bloc Montreal as well as the Canadian Party of Quebec can take away some votes from the Liberal Party and could contribute to the CAQ or another party prevails. The same goes for the Green Party and Climat Québec in ridings where Québec solidaire could win.

The third parties presented 242 candidates, or nearly 30% of the total number of candidates running.

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The Green Party, Climat Québec or Bloc Montréal: Are Third Parties Visible Enough? | Elections Quebec 2022

Spread the love

The Green Party, Climate Quebec or Bloc Montreal: are the third parties visible enough? | ÉQuebec 2022 elections

In addition to the five main political parties, some twenty parties are active in publicizing their candidates and their ideas. Of this number, the Green Party of Quebec and Climat Quebec, dedicated to the environmental cause, and the Bloc Montreal which wishes to make the metropolis shine more.

< source srcset="https://images.radio-canada.ca/q_auto,w_960/v1/ici-tele/jeunesse/16x9/urne-election-vote-quebec-main-democratie-voter-jeune -child-grass.jpg" media="(min-width: 0px) and (max-width: 99999px)"/>

Third parties field 242 candidates, nearly 30% of the total number of candidates running in the October 3 general election.

It was the night of the leaders' debate at Radio-Canada. Outside, through the heavy security, pressure groups and activists demonstrated with placards and banners to the sound of the music of the Fringants Cowboys.

Among them was the leader of the Green Party of Quebec, Alex Tyrrell. With others, he calls for a reform of the voting system. His party won nearly 2% of the vote in the general election of October 2018. If we had had an absolute proportional system, we would have won two seats in the National Assembly and even more if we considers strategic voting, he argues.

He denounces, by the same token, the presence of the leader of the Conservative Party of Quebec at the leaders' debate.

“That doesn't make sense!” The Green Party of Quebec received more votes than the Conservative Party in the last election. Despite this, his leader is in the debate, while I am in the street, on the sidewalk, answering questions. »

— Leader of the Green Party of Quebec, Alex Tyrrell

In the center, the leader of the Green Party of Quebec, Alex Tyrrell and the deputy leader, Halimatou Bah, surrounded by candidates during the march for the climate.

The leader of the Greens also criticizes the lack of media coverage. It is deplorable, there has been no article on the Green Party in the media as we have reached the 25th day of the electoral campaign, he claims.

In 2018, his party obtained nearly 9,000 votes more than the Conservative Party of Quebec, but the latter was able to enter the National Assembly when the former CAQ member Claire Samson joined the party.

>

According to political scientist and professor of political science at the University of Quebec in Outaouais, Thomas Collombat, it gave the Conservative Party greater visibility: From the moment you set foot in the Blue Room, the media and the x27;the electorate no longer look at you the same way. Having a member of the National Assembly gave him a different status, a different audience and made it possible for him to get in the game.

Listen to the report by Karine Mateu on the show L'L'heure du monde on ICI Première.

In the middle of the election campaign, marches for the climate were held all over the world, including one in Montreal. A favorite place for the Green Party of Alex Tyrrell, who was there with several of his candidates, but also for Climat Québec led by Martine Ouellet.

The former PQ minister and former leader of the Bloc Québécois managed to recruit 54 candidates across the province. Created last year, his party is also entirely dedicated to the environmental cause. We created Climat Québec because the whole political offer was not at all suitable. She was not up to solving the climate crisis. The walkers will encourage decision-makers to take radical action. There is a radical action accessible to citizens: it is to completely change the political class, supports the leader.

Martine Ouellet, leader of the Climat Québec party and candidate in Marie-Victorin. His party has 54 candidates.

According to her, even if the major parties include measures related to the environment in their electoral platforms, they remain unable to stand up to the big polluters.

“The five parties are incapable of dealing with economic lobbies and the issue that best illustrates this is the [ Foundry] Horne. »

— The head of Climat Québec, Martine Ouellet

Even Québec solidaire wants to keep the Horne open, while the plant sprays poison, arsenic, on the heads of citizens. He is on his knees and yet he is only in opposition, she laments.

Despite everything, it is not easy for the Green Party and Climat Québec to stand out in the current election, believes political scientist Thomas Collombat.

These issues [such as the environment], which are usually carried by third parties, are present in the main debate, so the media and the electorate have less interest in third parties . Moreover, what is interesting is that Québec solidaire, like the parties that preceded it, were for a long time these small parties which tried to make themselves heard in the polls, which tried to invite them into the debates, which were trying to elect certain deputies, he underlines.

In the west of Montreal, at the corner of Sherbrooke and Gray streets, the signs of Balarama Holness, leader of Bloc Montreal, are clearly visible. The former football player, who made a name for himself at the municipal level by running for mayor of Montreal, this time launched himself into the provincial arena. Just as the Bloc Québécois does for Quebec in Ottawa, Bloc Montreal wants to defend the metropolis in the National Assembly.

“You don't have to be just a creature from Quebec. You need to be recognized, have more autonomy, more powers and more financial resources. »

— Bloc Montreal leader Balarama Holness

Montreal has a lot of potential, but it can't afford it right now, laments the leader.

From left to right: the candidate in Saint-Henri–Sainte-Anne, Janusz Kaczorowsky, the candidate in Westmount–St-Louis, Heidi Small, and the leader of Bloc Montréal and candidate in Notre-Dame-de-Grâce, Balarama Holness .

With two of his candidates, Heidi Small, in Westmount–St-Louis, and Janusz Kaczorowski, in Saint-Henri-Sainte-Anne, the leader distributes leaflets and talks with passers-by. The reception is good and people are smiling and polite. By chance, two people confide that they will vote for Heidi, who is delighted. She who lives in the neighborhood believes that proximity to voters makes the difference: I'm from here, it's a very different experience. I do everything in Westmount: I buy clothes, I go to the fishmonger, the butcher, the doctor, everything. I am, here, every day.

Janusz adds: I think Montreal is really special. We have a multicultural, multiethnic spirit. I feel like a Montrealer first and foremost, he says proudly.

The important thing is the quality of the candidates and not the number, defends Balarama Holness, whose party has only 13. We could have had post candidates, he says, but rather, it was decided that each candidate would have resources. I would rather elect four out of 13 candidates than none out of 50!

Like the leader of the Green Party, he feels that the media does not give enough space to small parties, but also stigmatizes them. We have an interesting platform on health, education, but the media does not take them and characterizes us as an Anglophone party that manifests. Yes, we are against law 96, but not against French. It can be dangerous. I have received death threats in the past. We have to be careful, he pleads.

For Thomas Collombat, it is interesting for a small party to target a particular issue, but its expansion then remains limited, as does its weight within a majority government. That being said, according to him, all these third parties can have an influence on the outcome of the vote: Bloc Montreal as well as the Canadian Party of Quebec can take away some votes from the Liberal Party and could contribute to the CAQ or another party prevails. The same goes for the Green Party and Climat Québec in ridings where Québec solidaire could win.

The third parties presented 242 candidates, or nearly 30% of the total number of candidates running.

Previous Article
Next Article