The hottest spot on earth. Island found warming 13 times faster than the rest of the land

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Hottest spot on Earth. Island found warming 13 times faster than the rest of the land

Studies show that a tiny island in the Arctic Ocean is warming an incredible 2.7°C per decade.< /p> Related video

Norwegian climatologists have spent four years studying climate data collected in the eastern part of the Barents Sea. When researchers discovered a tiny island that is warming 13 times faster than the global average, they couldn't believe their eyes, writes Aljazeera.

Ketil Isaksen, a climate scientist from Oslo, Norway, says that they discovered, went beyond what scientists had observed in other regions before. The information even had to be double-checked to make sure the authenticity of the calculations. However, there was no mistake, scientists actually stumbled upon a point that is heating up faster than other regions on Earth.

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We are talking about a tiny island in the northeast of Svalbard. Charles XII Island is a jagged strip of rock just 2 kilometers long, jutting out into the Barents Sea.

According to Isaksen, he and his colleagues found that, on average, the island warms by a record 2.7°C per decade, while the global average is only 0.2°C per decade. The researchers suggest that by the end of the century the temperature on Charles XII Island will rise by 12°C.

Climatologists say their findings provide further evidence that global surface temperatures will rise by 2.6 to 4.8°C by 2100, inevitably leading to sea level rise of 0.5 to 0.98 meters. Researchers are confident that such climate change will eventually lead to the displacement of millions of people from coastal areas, increased drought, extreme heat, the spread of disease, a food crisis and other catastrophic weather events.

According to American environmentalist Amanda Ziegler, which is studying Arctic seafloor food webs as part of the Nansen Climate Research Project, warming is not only happening at the surface of the ocean, it will also affect the seafloor at some point.

Ziegler believes this is a wake-up call because, in the long run, seafloor heating could affect the ability of underwater food webs to store carbon, thereby removing it from the atmosphere and mitigating global warming.

Isaksen and his team used climate models to predict warming on the eastern side of the Svalbard archipelago – the results showed that it would be higher. However, scientists have found that this happens much faster than scientists would have expected.

The heating of the Arctic Ocean significantly affects the Gulf Stream, which is in fact a warm current. As a result, the Gulf Stream becomes even warmer and spills further to the northeast. Scientists note that at the moment the Arctic Ocean is undergoing some kind of “Atlantication” and will continue to change ecosystems and weather in such a way that the climate of the region will more resemble an ice-free Atlantic.

In addition, the researchers believe that areas to the east are warming even faster than Charles XII Island, but so far there is no evidence for this – new studies will be required.