The Hubble telescope captured the colorful fireworks left after the terrible death of a star (photo)

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Hubble telescope captured colorful fireworks left after the terrible death of a star (photo)

The remnant of a supernova explosion, which is located near our galaxy, was the focus of a space telescope.

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A colorful supernova remnant left behind by the death of a star glows like fireworks in space in an amazing new image from the Hubble Space Telescope. This structure is located in the Milky Way's satellite galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud, and hides a rapidly rotating neutron star, writes Space.

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The blue and orange threads intertwined in a complex pattern are the remnant of a supernova called DEM L 190, also known as LMC N49. Such remnants appear as a result of a powerful explosion when a huge star ends its life cycle.

DEM L 190 is located at a distance of 160 thousand light years from us in the small galaxy Large Magellanic Cloud, which is a satellite of our galaxy. This supernova remnant, which is 75 light-years across, is the brightest such object in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The colorful filaments of matter shown in the Hubble image will become the basis for the emergence of new stars in this galaxy in the future.

The Hubble telescope captured colorful fireworks left after the terrible death of a star (photo)

Hubble telescope captured colorful fireworks left after the terrible death of a star (photo)

But after the supernova explosion, not only these bright fragments of the star remained. Scientists believe that a rapidly rotating neutron star is hiding inside this gas cloud. It appeared as a result of the destruction of the core of the original star and its compression to a very small size under the influence of gravity.

According to scientists, this neutron star is equivalent in weight to the weight of the Sun, but its diameter is approximately 20 km. This star is so dense that a teaspoon of matter here weighs about 4 billion tons. This neutron star rotates around its axis at great speed and makes a complete revolution in just 8 seconds. At the same time, it has the strongest magnetic field, which is a quadrillion times larger than the Earth's magnetic field.

Hubble telescope captured colorful fireworks left after the terrible death of a star (photo) -strashnoj-smerti-zvezdy-foto-d1d6a32.jpg

Thanks to a powerful burst of gamma radiation, this neutron star was discovered more than 40 years ago. Since then, she has thrown out only a few streams of such powerful radiation. In fact, neutron stars that have a huge rotation speed and such a strong magnetic field are called pulsars.

Scientists obtained a new image of the supernova remnant DEM L 190 as part of a study of how such objects interact with the interstellar medium, that is gas and dust in interstellar space. But scientists want to know how this process occurs in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Astronomers are also interested in how small clouds of gas and dust contribute to the evolution of supernova remnants and change their structure.

For the second time in its history, the Hubble Space Telescope has looked at DEM L 190. For the first time, it took a picture of this structure 19 years ago, but the new image is better and more accurate, which makes this photo even more important for research.

Focus already wrote that scientists have discovered an exoplanet, which is twice as dense as Earth. But they still do not know exactly how it appeared.