The secret of the very first black holes is revealed: scientists have learned how they appeared

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    The secret of the very first black holes is solved: scientists have learned how they appeared

    The 20-year-old mystery of how the earliest black holes in the universe were born may already be solved.

    Scientists have been trying for two decades to understand how supermassive black holes appeared in the early universe during the first billion years after the Big Bang, which are billions of times heavier than the Sun. A new study shows that mysterious dark matter is involved in their birth. It was she who created the streams of cold gas from which the first giant stars appeared, and after their death, the first supermassive black holes, reports the Independent.

    “For a supermassive black hole with a mass of 100,000 solar masses to appear, a huge star with a mass of 100,000 solar masses must die. holes,” says Daniel Whalen, a cosmologist at the University of Portsmouth.

    New computer simulations by scientists show that the appearance of the first giant black holes in the universe was not without the participation of mysterious dark matter.

    “In our Universe, in addition to ordinary matter, there is also about 25% dark matter, but we still don't know exactly what it is, but it affects the evolution of galaxies and clusters of galaxies,” Whalen says.

     The secret of the very first black holes is revealed: scientists have learned how they appeared

    Scientists believe that in the very early Universe, dark matter contracted under the influence of its own gravity into long cosmic filaments and pulled ordinary matter into them as well. As a result, a web of these threads appeared in space, which intersected with each other at special intersection points. Stars and galaxies were created inside these filaments, and especially a lot of them appeared at the intersection points of the filaments, where there was a lot of ordinary matter.

    “We call these points cosmological halos and believe that it was here that the very first stars,” says Whalen.

    Scientists believe that in order for a huge star to appear in the early Universe and then a supermassive black hole, the halo must grow to enormous sizes under special conditions: there should be no other stars nearby, the gas must remain cold so that its streams cannot form for a long time star until its volume reaches a huge size and as a result a giant star appears.

     The secret of the very first black holes is revealed: scientists have learned how they appeared

    When a star died, it turned into a supermassive black hole, which grew in size due to the huge volume of surrounding gas that it absorbed. Putting all the necessary components together in the new model, the scientists found that as a result of the action of cold gas flows in the halo, two huge stars were formed – one with a mass of 31,000 solar masses, and the second with 40,000 solar masses.

     The secret of the very first black holes has been revealed: scientists have learned how they appeared

    “It's very simple, flows of cold gas contribute to the emergence of supermassive stars, and those in turn create supermassive black holes after death,” — says Whalen.

    But scientists admit that this is only a computer simulation and would love to see confirmation of the formation of such a black hole in the early universe. And that's where the Webb Space Telescope can help.

    “I think that this telescope will be able to observe the appearance of black holes as early as 1 or 2 million years after the Big Bang,” says Whalen.

    < p>Focus has already written about the unusual behavior of a black hole that has not completely swallowed a star close to it.

    As for other astronomical studies, Focus has already wrote that there may be planets around “flesh-eating” dead stars and scientists have figured out how to find them.

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