They shoot blanks. Scientists believe that warm winters irreversibly changed sperm squirrels

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 They shoot blanks. Scientists believe that warm winters have irreversibly changed the sperm of squirrels

Researchers have also noticed that some other animals are responding to climate change by changing their bodies.

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For decades, scientists have been studying how climate change affects individual species and the planet as a whole. This time they noticed that global warming has affected Richard's gophers (squirrel family) living in the Canadian prairies, because of the warm winters, the animals come out of hibernation earlier and “shoot blanks”, writes the Daily Mail.

The group researchers from the University of Manitoba decided to look at how climate change affects animals in other regions. Note that the study shows that climate change has changed sperm squirrels, but this is unlikely to be “fatal” for the species – in spite of everything, the number of squirrel offspring has not decreased.

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However, scientists believe that it's too early to relax – such changes indicate that the larger the climate change, the more they will affect the ecosystem as a whole.

According to Jane Waterman, co-author of the study, head of the Laboratory for Behavioral, Environmental and Evolutionary Research at the University of Manitoba, this finding indicates that in some cases nature can quickly respond to rapid environmental changes.

During the study, scientists also studied African ground squirrels in the pastures of South Africa. The researchers found that these members of the squirrel family responded in a striking way to an increase in temperature of more than 1.5 degrees Fahrenheit – the size of the animals' legs increased significantly. the size of their feet. Researchers believe that South African ground squirrels are responding to climate change by “changing shape”.

Warrington says the larger legs seem to help the animals generate more heat than smaller-legged squirrels and thereby cool down. The researchers suggest that the decrease in body size of ground squirrels serves the same purpose.

Scientists suggest that along with external changes, internal ones also occur, and therefore more research will be needed to understand how the body protein changes under the influence of stress.