We clone a person. Scientists have told how realistic it is to create a copy of yourself

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Cloning a human. Scientists told how realistic it is to create a copy of yourself

As science has advanced, our ability to clone and reproduce genes, embryos, and even entire mammals has grown. But how close are we to creating a complete replica of your family member?

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The whole world remembers 6LLS, or, more commonly, Dolly the Sheep. The Finnish Dorset sheep was the first mammal to be cloned from an adult somatic cell, breaking the barriers of science and proving that reproductive cloning is possible. A whole world of possibilities lay before scientists. Soon, both those in biotechnology and those outside of it ushered in a new era of human exploration and potential – and what could be better than the beginning of a new millennium, writes the Express.

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But just two years later, 19 European countries agreed to ban human cloning after then French President Jacques Chirac called for an international complete ban this practice. Basically the whole world followed, and while some experiments were made afterwards, it was mostly considered a no-go zone.

Science has come a long way over the years, with proven cases of cloning, and more radical claims of fully cloned humans. But where are we today? In a world bordering on science fiction?

Not just one type of cloning

Popular culture has led many to think that cloning means making an exact copy of a person. Almost every year a movie hits theaters that somehow portrays the far-fetched idea of ​​cloning: Jurassic Park, Logan, 6th Day. They all present us with a perfect form, or at least an ideal, of what human cloning entails. But they were not far from the truth.

While human cloning is technically possible, it is not the only or most logical cloning practice. There are three types of cloning:

  • Gene cloning (also known as DNA cloning);
  • Reproductive cloning (produces copies of whole mammals like Dolly);
  • < li>Therapeutic cloning (production of embryonic stem cells, the most common type of cloning).

There are several claims by different people about reproductive cloning, but they mostly come from dubious and later debunked sources. The best, perhaps, came in 2002 from Clonaid, which is associated with the New Age religious movement Raëlism. Then the French chemist Brigitte Boisselier announced that she had cloned the first ever human child Eve, but refused to present the child to scientists for study.

We are cloning a person. Scientists have told how realistic it is to create a copy of yourself

Cloning a human. Scientists say how realistic is it to create a copy of yourself

“This is complete nonsense,” said Professor Matthew Cobb, a zoologist at the University of Manchester, when asked about Eve. “There was a lot of excitement after Dolly the sheep. But you just have to look around and think, wait a minute, what happened? Everyone was very excited. And then … nothing happened.

Professor Cobb, who has written extensively about genetics and humans “playing God”, said that there are too many “technical difficulties” associated with human cloning, not least “safety”.

” The reason it didn't happen is because it's incredibly hard to do with mammals,” he said.

“The biggest and most important question that no one seems to ask is why “Why do we want to do this? And what are the health implications of what you create, whatever you create, be it mammal, primate, or human? At this point, we don't know.”

We don't know what might happen to humans, but we do know what happened to Dolly and her cloned offspring. While Dolly died prematurely due to a lung tumor, most of the lambs that were cloned from her continued to live healthy, normal lives.

But it took scientists 277 attempts to get Dolly from a breast cell. It has been argued that doing this to a human would be unethical by any means.

And here moral and ethical considerations come into play: how ethical is it to produce someone who was cloned from another person? What place would this person take in society? How would they feel if they learned about their creation story?

A common misconception associated with human cloning is that the clone will appear exactly like the person it was cloned from. It is not true. He has to be born, grow up, survive the trials and tribulations of childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. It will look like the person it was cloned from, like a twin, but its thoughts, feelings, personality and tastes will be completely different from their “master”.

“How would you feel if it happened to you?” Professor Cobb asked. If you were told that the only reason you exist is to save the life of a brother or sister, or to grant the wishes of your parents or clone master.”

These are things that weren't really considered in practical application, and therefore partly explain why there has been no progress since Dolly.