Where Christopher Columbus was actually born: scientists are closer to unraveling this mystery

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Where Christopher Columbus was actually born: scientists get closer to solving this mystery

Spanish explorers discover 15th-century tomb to test the theory about the origin of the famous navigator.

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It is now believed that Christopher Columbus, who discovered America to Europeans in 1492, was born in Italy in 1451. But some scientists insist that this navigator was actually born in Spain. A new study by Spanish scientists aims to put an end to these disputes, writes The Guardian.

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Spanish scientists have opened the tomb of a 15th-century cleric and exhumed his bones to test the theory that Christopher Columbus was born in Galicia, a region in northwestern Spain, and not in Genoa, which was the capital of the Republic of Genoa (a state that has existed since the end of 11th century to the end of the 18th century in northwestern Italy).

Some scholars believe that Columbus may have been born in either Galicia, Catalonia, or Valencia, regions of present-day Spain, although there are those who claim he was born in Portugal. But the generally accepted theory is that this navigator was Italian.

A group of Spanish archaeologists and anthropologists discovered a tomb in the church of San Martin de Sobran in the Galician city of Villagarcia de Arosa. In this tomb, a local nobleman and clergyman, John Marinho de Sotomayor, was buried, who, as local scientists suggest, may have been a cousin of Columbus.

Scientists have extracted DNA from seven bone fragments, and now they want to match this data with DNA samples that were taken from the remains of Columbus, his brother and son. Although DNA samples were collected from the remains of Columbus as early as 2004 to 2005, scientists had to wait many years for the technology needed to properly analyze Columbus to be determined. Scientists also collected DNA samples from the remains of other people who are buried in another local church, and these people are also considered possible relatives of the navigator.

Where Christopher Columbus was actually born: scientists are closer to solving this mystery

Where Christopher Columbus was actually born: scientists have come close to unraveling this mystery< /p>

Spanish scholars who support the idea of ​​a Spanish origin for Columbus point out that the surname Colón (the Spanish interpretation of the surname Columbus) is very common in Galicia. They even suggest that the local nobleman Pedro Alvarez de Sotomayor was hiding under the name Christopher Columbus.

“Our data indicate that Columbus was still born in Italy, but in order to be sure of this, we need to conduct a new analysis of his remains and compare these data with the collected DNA from his possible relatives. We need to close this issue forever and put an end to the disputes between scientists,” says José Antonio Lorente of the University of Granada, Spain.

Where Christopher Columbus was actually born: scientists are closer to solving this mystery

Where Christopher Columbus was actually born: scientists have come close to unraveling this mystery

Christopher Columbus died in Spain in 1506 at the age of 54. Initially, he was buried in the Spanish city of Seville. But according to his will, then his remains were transferred in 1542 to the island of Hispaniola (as the island of Haiti was called in the past, where two countries are now located – Haiti and the Dominican Republic). After that, at the end of the 18th century, the remains of Columbus were reburied in the cathedral of Havana, Cuba. But after the Spaniards lost the war to the United States and they took Cuba for themselves, the remains of the navigator were again transported to Seville in 1898.

During his not very long life, Columbus made 4 voyages to the shores of the New World, as they called it then America. Although, in fact, Columbus was looking for a western route to India, and only then it became known that he discovered a new continent.

By the way, it is already known that Columbus was not the first to discover America and the Vikings did it before him. But due to the fact that this information was not known outside of Scandinavia, the title of the discoverer of America was assigned to Columbus for several centuries.

Focus already wrote that for another 150 years before the voyages of Columbus, Italian sailors still knew about the existence of America.

As for ancient burials, as Focus already wrote, scientists believe that in Ancient Egypt the bodies were not mummified at all in order to save them.