Why the sailors were wrapped in machine-gun belts during the Revolution (PHOTOS)

Why the sailors were wrapped in machine-gun belts during the Revolution (PHOTOS)

They were wrapped in machine-gun belts not only in the Revolution. However, when it comes to revolutionary sailors, their image in the minds of the majority of the compatriot is inextricably linked, including with cross-tied machine-gun belts. And here it's time to ask: isn't it better to transport the tapes in a special box, which was created for this very purpose.

Why sailors were wrapped in machine-gun belts during the Revolution (PHOTOS)

1.

The sailors became one of the symbols of the revolution.

Why sailors were wrapped in machine-gun belts during the Revolution (PHOTOS)

Boxes for machine-gun belts appeared almost immediately with the appearance of the first machine guns. It is quite obvious that they were made to maximize the simplification of the transportation procedure and the subsequent use of the “ration” of the machine gun ammunition. However, in the realities of war, everything very often turns out not to be the same as in the minds of engineers. Soldiers and sailors were tied with ribbons when the use of boxes became impossible.

2.

Each ship had amphibious units.

Why sailors were wrapped in machine-gun belts during the Revolution (PHOTOS)

With regard to revolutionary Russia, it is safe to say that the most common machine gun in the country at that time was Maxim. Regular ammunition meant equipping the crew with 2,500 rounds of cartridges, 10 ribbons of 250 each. 1 ribbon for Maxim weighed about 6 kg. Thus, the mass of the full standard ammunition reached 60 kg. Of course, especially in the conditions of the Revolution and the Civil War, there was no talk of any staffing. However, even 2 tapes is a very representative load for a person who does not move empty-handed anyway.

3.

They did the same in World War II.

Why sailors were wrapped in machine-gun belts during the Revolution (PHOTOS)

In this respect, the box for machine-gun belts was only suitable for conducting defensive battles. But in offensive, including amphibious operations, dragging boxes (don't look at the handles) was completely inconvenient. So the sailors began to tie themselves with ribbons. And they did this long before the Revolution, during the First World War and the Russo-Japanese Wars. Many ships of the Russian fleet had landing platoons, which included machine gunners. For practical reasons, no one wanted to mess with heavy boxes, and therefore the sailors simply distributed the ribbons to the compartment serving Maxim's crew.

This is how the most dashing and recognizable symbol of the two Russian revolutions appeared in the people's consciousness and artistic space.

4.

Such comrades looked very brutal.

Why sailors were wrapped in machine-gun belts during the Revolution (PHOTOS)

Source: https://novate.ru/blogs/021020/56240/

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