With a penis in his hands and surrounded by leopards. World's oldest bas-relief found in Turkey

Spread the love

Share

  • With a penis in his hands and surrounded by leopards. In Turkey, discovered the oldest in world bas-relief (photo)

    send to Telegram

  • With a penis in his hands and surrounded by leopards. World's oldest bas-relief found in Turkey (photo)

    share on Facebook

  • With a penis in his hands and surrounded by leopards. The world's oldest bas-relief was discovered in Turkey (photo)

    send to Viber

  • With a penis in his hands and surrounded by leopards. The oldest bas-relief in the world was discovered in Turkey (photo)

    send to Whatsapp

With a penis in his hands and surrounded by leopards. The oldest bas-relief in the world was discovered in Turkey (photo)

The figure carved on the rock is considered the oldest in the world, although scientists have not yet understood what he was talking about.

Related video

Archaeologists have discovered a curious carving on benches built into the rock in the south-east of Turkey in the Urfa region, writes Live Science.

The study suggests that the find belongs to the Neolithic (new stone age). The found bas-relief is about 11,000 years old, making it the oldest ever documented. The picture shows two men surrounded by leopards. It is curious that scientists have not yet understood what exactly the author wanted to convey with the drawing.

U Focus. Technology has its own Telegram channel. Subscribe so you don't miss the latest and exciting news from the world of science!

The researchers note that the size of the bas-relief is about 0.7-0.9 meters in height and about 3.7 meters in length . The author depicted two men, one of whom holds his genitals in his hands, as well as a bull and two leopards.

With a penis in his hands and surrounded by leopards. World's oldest bas-relief found in Turkey (photo)

With penis in hand and surrounded by leopards. World's oldest bas-relief discovered in Turkey (photo)

It is noted that the author of the bas-relief, apparently, focused on the danger that leopards carry – this is evidenced by their sharp teeth, as well as the sharp horns of a bull. However, scientists, alas, have not been able to unravel the whole story.

Archaeologists have found a drawing in the Sayburch mound of the Neolithic era, 56 kilometers east of the Euphrates River and 32 kilometers north of the Syrian border. Note that this mound dates back to 9,000 BC, when our forager ancestors moved to farming and long-term settlements.

Archaeologists began excavations here last year and quickly discovered the ruins of a building with a diameter of about 11 meters. It is known that the room was carved into the limestone rock and consisted of stone walls and benches rising above the floor. According to the archaeologist involved in the excavations, Eilema Ozdogan from Istanbul University, the world's oldest bas-relief was discovered on the front of one of the benches located in the building.

With a penis in his hands and surrounded by leopards. World's oldest bas-relief found in Turkey (photo)

With penis in hand and surrounded by leopards. World's oldest bas-relief discovered in Turkey (photo)

Ozdogan notes that there are two separate scenes in the bas-relief that tell the same story. On the left, the author depicted a bull and a man looking at each other, the figure shows that the man has a “phallic extension on his stomach”, the left hand is depicted with six fingers, and in the right he holds something similar to a snake or a rattle.

< p> In the second scene, we can observe a man with a penis in his right hand, surrounded by leopards with open mouths and sharp teeth. At the same time, the leopards look at the man, and he seems to turn his gaze into the room.

The archaeologist also notes that, in terms of technique and craftsmanship, this bas-relief has something in common with other pre-ceramic Neolithic images in the region. However, the drawings of Cyburch are still unique, because they tell a certain story.

Note that the building in Cyburch has only been partially excavated, archaeological work is still ongoing. Ozdogan suggests that in the future, scientists may discover other drawings that will complement the “story” already found.